Printer Friendly

Cold, not cool: fish and shellfish storage tips for every day.

When fishing, there's never enough ice. Of course, keeping drinks and lunch cool is important, but "cool" doesn't cut the mustard when it comes to the safe storage of our catch. Once boated, both shellfish and finfish begin to degrade quickly. There are, however, a few tricks to remember.

The first thing to do is to get your ice as cold as possible. If you plan a fishing trip, throw a small bag of ice in the cooler the night before. Pre-cooling the cooler will temper it, and ice will last longer in the next day's heat. Then, as close to your point of departure as is possible, fill your cooler completely with ice. And, if possible, put a couple reusable frozen ice packs like the Arctic Ice Tundra or a handful of frozen bottles of water under your store-bought ice. That will prevent some melting and your ice will last longer.

Second, once your catch starts coming aboard, drain any water off your ice, add a few quarts of salt water to create a super-cooled slurry, and put your catch into the ice right away. Don't leave fish on the deck to die, as just a few minutes in the hot sun can make a big difference at the dinner table.

Finally, with regards to seafood safety, use an appropriate cooler. Unfortunately, the better coolers are the most expensive, but they do hold ice longer. Know that white coolers reflect sunlight and stay cooler while dark ones absorb heat, and any cooler kept in the shade will work best. And if you already own a dark surfaced cooler, consider covering it with a white towel.

Caption: A nice catch like this needs good care on the boat as well as in the kitchen.

COPYRIGHT 2017 InterMedia Outdoors, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2017 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

 
Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Sportsman's Kitchen
Author:Thompson, Tommy
Publication:Florida Sportsman
Date:Aug 1, 2017
Words:294
Previous Article:Tiny trophies: collecting small fish and invertebrates for marine aquariums.
Next Article:Island Hotel's hearts of palm salad.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters