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Cock-a-hoop; DON RODGERS Bargain Hunter.

Byline: DON RODGERS

I CAME across this interesting bright orange vase in a charity shop recently. It's known as a 'hooped' vase, a form usually associated with a specific part of the world: Scandinavia.

You see these kinds of vases traded on the internet all the time, attributed to different Scandinavian glass makers, or just described as 'Scandinavian'.

However, this particular vase, like many others similar to it, was produced a long way away from northern Europe: it was actually made in Japan.

That's what makes this piece interesting. Until quite recently, when some eagle-eyed collectors of 20th century glass spotted examples with original labels on internet auction sites, almost no-one realised that some vintage 'Scandinavian' glass was in fact Japanese.

There are indeed very collectable examples of genuinely Scandinavian glass made in this style: coloured cased glass with a layer of white on the inside.

Perhaps the most famous producer is the Danish firm of Holmegaard. From the 1960s they produced a number of ranges using white glass encased in opaque coloured glass, such as the Carnaby, Rainbow and Palet ranges.

The other vase you see here really is by Holmegaard. Although this example is in clear smoky amber glass, this shape of vase was also produced in a cased version.

It's known as a Gulvvase and was originally designed by Otto Brauer in 1962, based on a 1958 design by one of Holmegaard's most famous designers, Per Lutken.

So how can you tell that the orange hooped vase, which isn't marked and has no label, is Scandinavian in style but wasn't made by a Scandinavian company like Holmegaard? Holmegaard vases, like the one shown here, generally employ bold but simple lines - that's what makes them striking.

The glass and finish is also of very high quality.

While the orange vase is attractive, particularly the colour, the shape is a bit lumpish and congested.

In addition, the top of the vase is at a slant, whereas a Holmegaard vase would be level - a wonky one wouldn't get past quality control.

The biggest surprise as far as I was concerned was that both vases sell on the internet for about the same price.

A Holmegaard Gulvvase will set you back around PS50, while a hooped orange vase, identical to this one and correctly described as Japanese, sold recently on eBay for a similar sum.

I paid PS3.99 for my hooped vase, while the Holmegaard Gulvvase, which also came from a charity shop, cost just PS2.

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| Orange hooped vase and, far left, Holmegaard vase
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales)
Date:Nov 2, 2013
Words:426
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