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Children consuming increased amounts of fruit-flavored beverages and carbonated soft drinks. (News Briefs).

Children consuming increased amounts of fruit-flavored beverages and carbonated soft drinks: A new study in the has confirmed the generally received view among many medical experts that children and adolescents are drinking higher levels of fruit-flavored beverages and carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) than 100% fruit juices. Researchers from the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences surveyed beverage consumption among more than 10,000 children. They found that, while most are within guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics for juice consumption, their consumption of fruit-flavored drinks and CSDs exceeds their juice intake from as early as five years of age.

"Our research found that at around age seven, children's consumption of 100% real juice flat-lines, while intake of fruit-flavored beverages increases," said the research group leader, Gail Rampersaud. "By the time children turn 13 years old, they are drinking nearly four times more carbonated soft drinks than 100% juice."
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Title Annotation:research shows
Comment:Children consuming increased amounts of fruit-flavored beverages and carbonated soft drinks. (News Briefs).(research shows)
Publication:Food & Drink Weekly
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 27, 2003
Words:153
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