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Chevron pays nearly $700,000 for past Clean Air Act violation; cuts yearly emissions by 200 tons.

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--March 25, 1996--The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) today announced that Chevron U.S.A. Inc. has brought its Perth Amboy, N.J. facility into compliance with the sulfur oxide emission regulations of the Clean Air Act and has reduced its emissions of sulfur oxides by about 200 tons per year. Chevron has also paid nearly $700,000 in penalties for violating the sulfur oxide emission regulations.

"EPA's enforcement efforts have resulted in a real benefit for human health and the local environment," said Jeanne M. Fox, EPA Region 2 Administrator. "Chevron had dramatically cut its emissions of sulfur dioxide, which is known to irritate lungs and exacerbate existing lung conditions such as Asthma."

"With today's settlement, the people of Perth Amboy can breath a little easier -- Chevron is now complying with Clean Air Act regulations and paying a substantial price for past violations," said Lois J. Schiffer, assistant attorney general in charge of the Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division. "We will continue to make sure this law protects the people from pollutant emissions."

Through a series of inspections conducted in late 1992 and 1993 and formal information requests, EPA determined that Chevron had replaced an air pollution control device with a less efficient one when it downsized its processes in 1983.

In 1993, Chevron installed new pollution abatement equipment, but did not follow through with required testing and monitoring of its emissions. In November 1993, EPA issued an order to Chevron mandating that it test the crude heaters at its Perth Amboy, N.J. refinery to ensure that each unit was complying with the regulations governing sulfur oxide emissions.

Chevron challenged the need to perform these tests and filed a Petition for Review in the Third Circuit in August 1994. In May 1995, testing by Chevron demonstrated that, after making several adjustments to the pollution abatement equipment to improve treatment efficiency, the facility was able to meet the sulfur oxide requirements of the Clean Air Act. Chevron has paid the $700,000 penalty and has agreed to drop its Petition of Review.

EPA Region 2 news releases can be received automatically via the internet. Send a message to Listserver@unixmail.rtpnc.epa.gov saying: Subscribe EPA-R2-PRESS (Your Name).

CONTACT: Mary Mears, 212/637-3669

email: Mears.Mary@epamail.epa.gov

or

U.S. Department of Justice

Jim Sweeney, 202/514-2008
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Publication:Business Wire
Date:Mar 25, 1996
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