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ChessWITH THE KNIGHT.

TWO weeks ago I dedicated the article to the challenges and pleasures of teaching chess, focussing on the moves of the Rook. It was encouraging to receive some positive feedback on this.

Primarily it came from parents trying to teach their children but not exclusively. Tagged on to this, almost universally, was a request to explain the moves of the knight.... described as mysterious by one person. And it often is to a beginner. I have tried several ways of helping people ( adults as well as children) to understand the knight move which I will describe below.

But before that, may I share three lessons that I learned through the experience of many years of teaching. One, if the student did not understand what I said, repeating the same words louder rarely helped.

Two, repeating the same description using more or less the same words a second time, but a bit more slowly can help.

But if it doesn't, then you need to find some different words. Three, pictures are often a massive help. Hopefully you will find the following helpful. It is not intended to be patronising. Some people pick this up very quickly but the majority do not, therefore some patience and disguised repitition is often necessary.

The Knight looks like a horse. It can jump over things. It is the only chess piece that can jump. It cannot jump very far...only over one square. How far can it jump? It can jump forwards or backwards or sideways. Which way can it jump? It cannot jump off the board! Where can it not jump? It always jumps from a light square to a dark square or from a dark square to a light square.

This Knight is on a light square. If it moves what colour will it land on? Put a Knight on b1. I want to move this Knight, what colour square can it go to? (b1 is a light square therefore the answer is a dark square......this is the tricky bit!!.....going forwards it jumps over b2 and lands on a3 or c3... nearest dark squares. Repeat this example several times as you move the piece, saying that different players work this out with different words. Two squares forward and one sideways. Or some people say one square forward and one diagonally.

Let them move the knight from b1. Repeat from different starting squares. Now remember we said that the knight can move sideways d7.

on pawn white the capture can knight Black the ad move to has king White The check.

is it first f6 to moves Knight the if ,However Queens.

pawn the and move Whites' then is it game a in f8 to moves knight Black the If C.

g3 and h5 g7, e6, to moving by pawns the capture can knight Black The b7.

and c5 e4, c3, to moving by pawns the capture can knight White The B.

pawn.

a capture to e7 or b6 to move can knight Black The c2.

or b3 either to move can knight White The A.

ANSWERS

CAPTION(S):

A. Which squares can the white knight get to in one move? Which of the white pawns can the Black knight capture in one move?

B. 1. This doesn't happen in real games but if you were White here explain how you can capture the Black pawns in 4 successive moves. 2. And here with Black to move and capture the White pawns in 4 moves.

C. How can Black stop the White pawn from moving to d8 and becoming a Queen?

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Title Annotation:Sport
Publication:Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)
Date:Mar 8, 2019
Words:599
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