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Chapter 3: Introduction to computerization.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERIZATION

The best way to understand and gain computerization skills is to work on a computer. This chapter will assist in preparing you for travel agency computer operations. You should already have a good working knowledge of city/airport, airline, equipment, and fare codes before beginning this chapter.

Most travel agency computer systems have programmed lessons for training, and many agency managers send their employees to the training centers of the host systems. But to become computer proficient in formats, keys, operations, and procedures requires time and experience--like learning a language. And the training is ongoing as system enhancements and upgrades are made.

This chapter covers functions, terminology and basic procedures. An overview of the specifics of selecting a system is provided. Queues and queue handling is presented, followed by information and exercises on availability formats.

The next chapter presents the details of fares and fare research. And in Chapter 5, manual reservations are covered, followed by reading and selling from sample availability displays. Building Passenger Name Records and other specifics are also included.

The information presented relies on the common procedures of all systems rather than the specific formats of any one system. Each system varies in the keys used to access/enter information and it takes a great deal of practice to memorize the entries. Agents will find it helpful to write up index cards for useful formats and entries used on the particular agency computer reservation system.
SELECTING A SYSTEM

The selection of a system depends on many factors, and the agency
should research and negotiate with the vendor before committing to
a contract. Agencies often select the system offered by the most
dominant carrier in the area; but other aspects to consider are the
capabilities, access, bias, fees, and services involved with that
particular system. Meet with at least three system vendors and ask
many questions. Call the local sales or district marketing office
of the vendor airline if you need to find out the automation sales
representative for your area. Be sure to involve other office/staff
members in the decision process, particularly your consultant or
most qualified employee. Take detailed notes at the presentations
in order to make meaningful comparisons as well as insure that any
"promises" made are kept if an agreement is reached. You should
also get answers to the following questions if they were not
already covered in the demonstration:

How soon can we have the equipment installed?
Is ARC approval necessary before any equipment can be installed?
Is there a minimum volume productivity requirement?
What about overrides/bonus commissions for certain business volumes?
What are the charges per ticket?
How many agencies in the area have this system?
What type of compensation is there if the system goes down?
Does the system offer a mail list and word processing function?
How much and what levels of training are provided?

Finally, have your lawyer review the contract and don't sign
anything unless you completely understand it and agree to it.


FUNCTIONS OF TRAVEL AGENCY COMPUTERS

Here is a list of the basic functions and data available on travel agency computer reservation systems:

FLIGHT SCHEDULES AND AVAILABILITY (plus direct access to the specific airline's available seats)

FARES AND FARE RULES

CREDIT CARD APPROVAL

AUTOMATIC ITINERARY PRICING (also re-pricing if fares change)

GENERATING TICKETING (both e-tickets/electronic tickets and paper)

PASSENGER NAME RECORDS AND FILES OF CLIENT INFORMATION

SEAT ASSIGNMENTS

MESSAGES RECORD (Queues) to advise of schedule and fare changes, ticket deadlines, waitlist clearances, etc.

INVOICE AND ITINERARY PRINTING

SPLIT SCREENS (2 to 4 displays simultaneously)

HOTELS AVAILABILITY AND BOOKING

CAR RENTALS AVAILABILITY AND BOOKING

TOUR COMPANIES AVAILABILITY AND BOOKING

CRUISE LINES AVAILABILITY AND BOOKING

RAIL RESERVATIONS AND TICKETING

MONTHLY MANAGEMENT REPORTS, AIRLINE SALES REPORTS, AGENT PRODUCTIVITY REPORTS, COMMISSION TRACKING, CLIENT SALES ANALYSIS, VENDOR SALES ANALYSIS

TRAINING LESSONS

CURRENCY EXCHANGE RATES, BANK DRAFTS, WEATHER INFORMATION, INSURANCE, SKI CONDITIONS,

EVENTS, TIME ZONES, ACTUAL FLYING TIME, MILEAGE, MINIMUM CONNECTING TIME

ENCODING AND DECODING AIRLINES, CITY/AIRPORT AND OTHER CODES

ONGOING COMMUNICATIONS WITH UP-TO-THE-MINUTE UPDATES, MANY OTHER DETAILS
DISCUSSION QUESTION:

DO YOU THINK THAT THE USE OF COMPUTER RESERVATION SYSTEMS BY
AGENCIES WILL EVENTUALLY BE REPLACED BY THE USE OF PERSONAL
COMPUTERS? WHY OR WHY NOT?


SUPPLIERS AND THE CRSs

The CRS company obtains revenue from (1) suppliers who pay to have their services included in the system, and (2) travel agencies who subscribe to the system.

Many suppliers have their own reservation systems (such as Amtrak and Hertz) but still participate in a CRS. Companies can choose to be included in a CRS at a certain level:

Level 1--Supplier displays schedules but not availability. Travel agents can obtain schedule information but must call the supplier for reservations.

Level 2--Supplier displays both schedules and availability. Travel agents can request reservations but must wait for a response.

Level 3--Supplier displays schedules and availability that enables agents to confirm reservations immediately. However, the link between the supplier and the CRS is not direct; the access to the information and full availability of seats is limited.

Level 4 -- Suppliers are linked to the CRS with direct access or direct links so that the flow of information and availability is continual and complete. Direct access means that a travel agent could obtain last seats available on a flight. Airlines establish a level at which a flight is closed for sale by others. For example, when only 6 seats remain on a specific flight, the airline might send a "closed" or "no seats available" message. CRSs with direct access can obtain these last seats by using a particular format for entry.

AGENCIES AND CRSs

Agencies who lease the CRS equipment agree on a certain minimum number of segments that will be booked. Afler discounts and penalties, most travel agencies pay about $100-$200 a month. Some agencies choose to purchase the equipment, which can make it difficult to change systems if the agency decides another CRS might be worthwhile. Some agencies have more than one CRS in their offices in order to increase productivity due to enhancements available on certain systems that are not available on another.

CRSs have made advancements to keep pace with personal computer technology. Windows-based, graphical products are available so that users can switch between the CRS and other software. For example, Apollo offers "Focalpoint," a system that includes electronic/e-mail, word processing, etc.

COMPUTERIZATION TERMINOLOGY

NOTE: New terms have been added They appear in bold This is a brief list of terms so consult other references for additional information.

A--Letter used in computerization for availability. Also the letter used for an "arunk" or surface segment (no flight involved).

AAA--Agent Assembly Area. The work areas available on the computer.

AGENT SIGN--An agent's personal identification code or passcode.

ALPHANUMERIC--Combination of letters and numbers.

APOLLO--The computer system sponsored by United Airlines/Covia Corp.

ARINC--Aeronautical Radio Incorporated. Company that provides communication services and owned primarily by the airlines.

ARNK or ARUNK--Abbreviation for "Arrival Unknown", used for a surface segment of an itinerary.

ASCII--American Standard Code for Information Interchange.

ATB--Automated Ticket/Boarding pass. However, boarding passes are usually issued by airline agents at check in.

ATFDS--Automated Ticket and Fare Determination System.

ATM--Automated Ticketing Machine. A self-service terminal for the issuance of tickets and other services.

AVAILABILITY--Display of flight schedules (or other supplier products) with the number of seats available per class/code (or rooms, cars, cabins, etc.).

BACK-OFFICE AUTOMATION--A travel agency accounting system that might also provide other functions such as management reports and word processing. Called "back office" because that's usually where the equipment is located.

BACKUP--To create a copy of an original computer disk.

BASIC--Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. Computer language specially designed for problem-solvers working on remote terminals.

BIAS--Giving preference, such as the intentional or unintentional display of flight information in a way that favors a particular airline.

BIT--A binary digit (0 or 1) in computerization; an elementary unit of information stored by a single component. BPI--Bits Per Inch. Density measurement of a tape or disk.

BPR--Pre-reserved seat/boarding pass (bilateral agreement required).

"BRICK AND CLICK"--A term used for a company that has both a physical headquarters for operations as well as a web site for operations online.

BROWSER--Software that lets you "surf the web" or access the Internet.

BSI and BSO--Basic Sign In and Basic Sign Out.

BUFFER--Area within a computer where data is temporarily stored.

BUG--A malfunction or error.

BYTE--Six or eight bits (see BIT).

CAI or CBI--Computer Assisted Instruction or Computer Based Instruction.

COBOL--Common Business Oriented Language. A procedure-oriented language for computer programming developed for business functions.

CPU--Central Processing Unit.

CRS--Computer Reservation System.

CRT--Cathode Ray Tube. Also called a monitor or a VDT.

CO-HOST--An airline or vendor who agrees to pay the host for displays of its flights, fares, or products. Sometimes called PARTICIPANT.

CURSOR--The visible reference mark on the CRT screen which shows the next area to place data.

DATABASE--Integrated files of data used for processing applications throughout an organization in contrast to an individual data file.

DATAS II--The computer system sponsored by Delta Air Lines. DATAS II and PARS (TWA's system) merged to form Worldspan.

DEBUG--To isolate and remove mistakes.

DEDICATED LINE--An electrical circuit set aside strictly for the agency's computer system power source.

DETACHED INTERFACE--The capability of a system to do accounting and other business functions while issuing tickets.

DIRECT ACCESS--The ability to go into a vendor's system in order to obtain last seat/product availability.

DISK--A magnetic file (also called diskette).

DOWNLINE--All segments, legs or cities listed below the originating or headline city.

DOWNLOAD--To transfer information from one source to another.

DOWN TIME--The time when a computer is inoperative.

DRS--Direct Reference System.

ENHANCEMENT--An additional feature, usually meaning more capabilities.

ENTRY--A reply to the system or request by the user for information.

E-MAIL--Electronic mail. Correspondence via a computer.

ETDN--Electronic Ticket Delivery Network. The third party network approved by ARC for electronic delivery of tickets, using ATMs or STPs. (see also ATMISTP)

FACT FILE--Collection of information; also called a direct reference system (DRS).

FIELD--An assigned area of record (such as name, phone, received from, ticketing, and form of payment fields).

FILE--A collection of related records.

FLIFO--Flight information.

FLOPPY DISK--Flexible disk.

FONE--Telephone.

FORTRAN--Any of several alphanumeric coding systems for programming specific procedures.

GDS--Global Distribution System.

HARD COPY--Copy printed on paper.

HARD DRIVE--An internal storage and operating capability on a computer (as opposed to operating a program from a disk).

HARDWARE--The physical components of a computer system.

HEADLINE--The originating city.

HISTORY--The detailed account of a record showing all the changes, requests, and responses made plus any other specifics.

HOME PAGE--Like a welcome mat of a web site. An initial home page usually describes what the site offers.

HOST COMPUTER--Airline computer to which the agency's terminals are connected; airline sponsor of the system.

HTML--Hypertext Markup Language. Most web pages or sites have an htmI or htm ending, indicating that the document is a HTML document.

HTTP--Hypertext Transfer Protocol--the protocol used by most web servers.

HYPERLINK--An electronic address within one document that describes a separate specific Internet location.

IAR- Interactive Agent Reporting,

INSERTION POINT -- Another name for cursor.

INTERFACE--Linkage between reservations made and various accounting functions such as invoicing, management reports, etc.

INTERNET--A huge network of computer-based information and communication resources that is accessible to anyone with a computer and a modem/other computer access link.

ISP--Internet Service Provider.

JOYSTICK--A lever used with a computer that can pivot in all directions (normally used with games).

K--Kilobyte. A measure of how much information can be stored, One K equals about 1000 characters or letters.

MIS--Management Information System.

MODEM--An electronic device that converts digital data from a terminal into electronic signals that can then be transmitted over telephone lines.

MONITOR--The TV type display screen equipment. Also called a CRT,

MOUSE--A device that manipulates and directs the cursor on a computer screen.

MULTI-ACCESS--A system that provides for direct access to the computers of several airlines and/or other suppliers.

OSI--OTHER SERVICE INFORMATION--Information included in the passenger name record that does not require specific action. For example: VIP customer.

PARS--The system sponsored by Trans World Airlines (TWA), which merged with DATAS II to form Worldspan.

PARTICIPANT--See CO-HOST.

PASSENGER NAME RECORD--The assigned information to the reservation file such as name, phone number, etc. Also called the confirmation number or RECORD LOCATOR.

PC--Personal Computer.

PNR--See PASSENGER NAME RECORD.

PPR--Passenger Profile Record.

PROFILE SYSTEM or FREQUENT TRAVELER--A list of frequent travelers and important customers with information on their travel preferences, typical methods of payment, and other information.

PSEUDO PNR--A term used to describe a reservation or other information stored in an airline computer using the same format as a standard PNR. Called "pseudo" because it doesn't include an airline reservation.

PURGE--To expel or make disappear. Most PNRs are purged from the system about 48 hours from the last flight on the itinerary. Information can be saved by printing a hard copy.

QUEUE--To line up; an area of messages on file.

RAM--Random Access Memory. Computer memory that allows the central processing unit to move or change a character without affecting other characters.

RECORD LOCATOR--Also called a PNR number or confirmation number; the identification to a file or record in the computer,

ROM--Read Only Memory. Computer memory that cannot be rewritten,

SABRE--The system sponsored by American Airlines.

SAI--System Assisted Instruction. Also see CAI or CBI.

SCROLLING--The method of moving up or down pages of information on the computer screen. Some entries for scrolling are MD--move down, MU--move up, or MT--move top, MB--move bottom.

SECOND (and THIRD) GENERATION--Refers to the development of more sophisticated equipment as technological advances are made.

SIGN IN and SIGN OUT--The entry and exit into computer operations.

SIPP--Standard Interline Passenger Procedures.

SITA--Societe Internationale Telecommunications Aeronautiques Societe Cooperative. The international equivalent to ARINC.

SODA--Systemone Direct Access (merged with the Amadeus CRS).

SOFTWARE--The programs used by a computer system, available in such forms as tapes or disks.

SSR--SPECIAL SERVICE REQUIREMENT--A request for specific action from the airline such as special meal requests, wheelchair assistance, etc.

SST--Self-Service Terminal. See ATM.

STP--Satellite Ticket Printer. Machine that provides an electronic delivery of tickets at locations other than travel agencies' main offices.

SYSTEMONE--See SODA. Merged with the CRS called Amadeus.

TAT--Transitional Automated Ticket.

TELETICKETING--An airline-generated automated ticketing procedure that is connected to subscriber travel agencies. Now obsolete.

TERMINAL--Usually refers to the monitor and keyboard equipment area.

TICKLER FILE--A method of organizing messages or tasks to be done; files for storing information in order to have data available.

TIS--Travel Information Service.

TST--Transitional Stored Ticket Record.

URL--Uniform/Universal Resource Locator. A web address.

VDT--Video Display Terminal (the computer screen). Also called a CRT.

VIRUS--An infection transmitted to computers via infected software or online communications.

WEB SITE--An address on the Internet that provides access to information, reservations, or the specifics and operations as dictated by the company or individual who set up the site.

WORLDSPAN--The system formed by the merger of PARS and DATAS II.

WWW--World Wide Web. An interconnected collection of more than 100,000 sites or "home pages."

REVIEW OF TERMINOLOGY

MATCH THE TERMS/ABBREVIATIONS WITH THEIR MEANING:
1. -- BPI               A. Computer programs
2. --STP                   (available on disks or CDs)
3. -- DIRECT ACCESS     B. Airlines Reporting Corporation
4. -- RECORD LOCATOR    C. Video Display Terminal
5. -- PNR               D. Satellite Ticket Printer
6. -- ATB               E. Agent's personal identification code
7. -- QUEUE             F. Special Service Requirement
8. -- VDT               G. Other Service Information
9. -- ATM               H. Automated ticket/boarding pass
10. -- AGENT SIGN       I. Bits per inch
11. -- CURSOR           J. Visible reference mark showing next
12. -- INTERFACE           area for data
13. -- BIAS             K. Ability to go into a vendor's system to
14. -- OSI                 obtain last seats
15. -- SSR              L. Giving preference
16. -- FIELD            M. An assigned area of record
17. -- SCROLLING        N. Linkage between reservations and accounting
18. --  SAI             O. System Assisted Instruction
19. -- ARC              P. Method of moving up or down the
20. -- SOFTWARE            information pages on a screen
                        Q. Passenger Name Record
                        R. Area of messages on file; to line up
                        S. Confirmation number or PNR number
                        T. Automated Ticketing Machine


OPTIONAL EXERCISE: DEFINE THESE NEW TERMS THAT HAVE BEEN ADDED TO THE LIST.

1. Browser --

2. Virus --

3. Web site --

4. Hyperlink --

5. GDS --

6. URL --

7. Download --

8. ISP --

9. WWW --

10. Home page --

OPERATING TRAVEL AGENCY COMPUTERS

The keyboards of the computer reservation systems all vary. Although the equipment is usually IBM compatible, the travel agency computers have a variety of special keys and accessory information on the regular typewriter style keyboard. For example:

NUMBER KEYS (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0) are used for FIELDS OF INFORMATION, also called IDENTIFIER KEYS.

There are FUNCTION KEYS, which allow the user to INSERT CHARACTERS, DELETE CHARACTERS, MOVE THE CURSOR, RE-ENTER INFORMATION, PERFORM MULTIPLE ENTRIES, ETC.

Before beginning any work on the computer, agents have to SIGN IN. There are usually six working areas (A,B,C,D,E,F). Each area can be signed in separately or all can be signed in with a single entry.

Each agent has a passcode/password (numbers and letters code) that must be entered correctly. A typical sign in entry might be:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

BSO is Basic Sign Out/Off. SON and SOF (Sign ON and Sign OFF) are also used. There are training lessons in the systems for agents to learn formats and operations. The ticketing machines and other computers may need to be signed in, and some systems use a LOG ON action (like an "automatic" sign in). After any entry is made, you press "ENTER." The computer will respond with an acknowledgment to your entries.

REVIEW

1. The number keys are often used for fields of information and are also called --.

2. BSI is an abbreviation for --.

3. Referring to the sample BSI above, if your passcode was 555XYZ/AD, write the "sign in" to work in area B --

4. How many work areas are normally available? --

5. A -- action may be used when ticketing and other computers have to be signed in.

QUEUES

After the SIGN IN or LOG ON procedure, most agents will "work their queues." The queues are the messages and changes to the reservations. For example, there may be a flight schedule change to a client's record. The travel agent needs to acknowledge the change and inform the passenger if the ticket has already been issued or if the change is a significant one. Each agent is assigned a Queue Number so that customer records receiving messages or changes will automatically be "filed" in the agent's queue. The agent can begin working his or her queues by entering:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

If unable to reach the customer regarding the changes or message to the record, the agent may wish to return the file to the queue. A sample entry to leave the record in the queues is: QUTR (Queue Unable to Reach), so the PNR is returned to the queues. For schedule changes the [CSS] key can be used. Below is a sample entry:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

NOTE: No spaces are necessary between items and formats will vary.

After changes have been recorded and inserted into the record, you need to END the record: Press the [E] (or ET) and then [ENTER]. If the customer was contacted and advised of the changes, the agent might enter QADVD, which means Q--Customer advised (ADVD). Agents often put a queue message into records for seat assignments, ticketing dates, etc.

MORE ON QUEUES

There are a number of formats and processing codes used when working with queues. A few are given below:

QDA/55--Display queues automatically from agent's queue #55

QC/55--Queue count/agent's queue # (to give you the total count of queues awaiting action)

I--Ignore (use for returning or leaving the record in queue)

QX--Exit queues

QR--Remove PNR from queue

QEP155--Place the PNR in the queue (agent's number 55)

If you found that a particular record belonged in another agent's queue you can route it to that agent's queue by entering QEP/and the agent's number.

At the time of completing a reservation, agents will enter in the dates for ticketing and seat assignments in the queues. Seat assignments can be done for most airlines if the departure is within 30 days. Each system varies however, and for host airlines seat assignments may be possible more than 30 days in advance. Check the information of the particular system for clarification.

5Q-20JUL/55/NSW

The above is a sample entry entered into the "remarks" field of a PNR for agent #55. It places the record in queues to be displayed on July 20 and NSW indicates the passenger prefers a non-smoking window seat.

Note: Although domestic flights of six hours or less are non-smoking, the passenger's preference is indicated for general reference.

AVAILABILITY FORMAT

To understand "queue handling skills," it is first necessary to cover some general procedures for displaying availability, selling segments and building PNRs. Displaying flight schedules with the availability of seats requires an entry such as: A20JANNYCLAX8A

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

NOTES

If you use the SKED key--S--for schedules--it will give you flights, but not the available seats.

DATE FORMAT should be in digit form followed by a three-letter abbreviation of the month. USING THE CITY CODE will list flights to ALL airports serving that city. USE THE AIRPORT CODE if a specific airport is requested. For example, using JFKLAX as the city pair will provide a list of flights leaving JFK airport in New York and arriving at any of the Los Angeles airports--Burbank, Ontario, International, Long Beach, etc. You should be familiar with the airports serving major cities (New York, Los Angeles, Dallas, Chicago, San Francisco, Washington--DC, etc.).

USE WHOLE NUMBERS for the time of departure. For morning use 8A (8:00 am), for afternoon 1P (1:00 pm), unless otherwise requested. Displays will normally include flights 112 hour before and 112 hour later than the time specified.

WITH ADDITIONAL CODES AND SYMBOLS you can request flight availability for a certain airline, a specific connecting city, etc.

ONCE THE DISPLAY OF FLIGHTS AND AVAILABILITY APPEARS, there are some "shortcut" entries that can be used to continue displaying availability.

AFTER THE A OR 1

Depress * = display additional flights

+1 = display the next day availability

-1 = display the previous day availability

*5P = display at this new time

R = display return flights (SAME DAY/DATE)

R27JAN = display return flights on Jan. 27

ID = direct service only

+DL = Delta airlines only

** = return to previous display

DECODING AND ENCODING

If you don't know the code for a city, the computer can encode the city name. If you see a code you don't recognize, the computer can decode it. Formats vary among systems; some possible entries are:
DECODING CITY/AIRPORT CODES

entry: DN PWM    response: PWM PORTLAND MAINE
or       KDBOS     response: BOSTON, MA
entry: W/* SFO   response: SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA

DECODING AIRLINE CODES

entry: DF MX     response: MX/*** 132 MEXICANA DE AVIACION
or W/*MX                      TKTG OK/BAG OK/CARGO OK
or KAD/MX


Note: The airline three-digit identification as well as ticketing and baggage agreements with the system's host airline are given in this example.

ENCODING CITY AIRPORT CODES
entry: DN HOLLYWOOD     response: LAX * HOLLYWOOD CA--14 MI
or W/-CCHOLLYWOOD                       FLL * HOLLYWOOD FL--5 MI
or KC/HOLLYWOOD                 HWO   HOLLYWOOD FLORIDA/HOTEL//


Note: The codes and names for three "Hollywoods" are provided to ensure the correct information is utilized.

ENCODING AIRLINE CODES

entry: DF LACSA response: LR/*** 133 LACSA

or W/-ALLACSA TKTG NO/BAG NO/CARGO NO

or KAC/LACSA

When first working on a system, it's helpful to remember formats by "making up" words for the different letters used. Examples: For DN you can say it means "decode and give the name for." For DF --"decode for." For W/-CC--"want the city/airport code for"; WI-AL--"want the airline code for."
To acquaint you with formats on different systems rather than a
specific one, this manual will rely on common procedures and
combine techniques/keys/operations. Allow for flexibility in your
training by focusing on information and capabilities and not
memorizing keys and letters.


NOTES

--

AVAILABILITY FORMAT EXERCISES

As practice for entering the availability format, WRITE OR TYPE formats for the requests given below. IF POSSIBLE HAVE SOMEONE READ THE REQUEST WHILE YOU WRITE/TYPE THE FORMAT on a sedate piece of a er. For these examples, use an A for AVAILABILITY.

EXAMPLE: I need to fly from Tampa to Miami January 4 around 5 pm.

You type or write: A04JANTPAMIA5P Note: for date you can use 04 or 4

1. Can you please give me the available flights leaving Pittsburgh for Atlanta on December 10? I would like to leave at 8:30 am.

2. Please give me the flights available going from New Orleans to Cincinnati leaving November 5 at 3 pm.

3. I would like a flight reservation to Phoenix from Los Angeles on the 3rd of April, leaving in the afternoon.

4. At what times are there flights available from Ft. Lauderdale to Nashville on December 24? I would like to depart at 2 pm.

5. Are there any flights available from Chicago to Buffalo on July 23 at 10 or 11 am?

6. I need a flight from Miami to Nassau on August 20 leaving at 9 am.

7. What flights are available from St. Louis to Seattle if I want to leave June 16 in the afternoon?

8. I need a reservation on a flight from Houston/Intercontinental airport to Las Vegas on June 19 at 10 or 11 am.

9. What flights are available from Cleveland to Boston, May 5 at 1 pm?

10. I would like the flights to San Francisco from Portland, Maine, on October 1 around 3 in the afternoon.

11. Can you give me the flight schedules available to San Antonio, Texas from Atlanta, Georgia? I want to leave September 6 in the morning.

12. Please tell me what are the available flights to Louisville, Kentucky from Denver, Colorado. My departure date is November 30 and I would like to leave about 9 or 10 am.

13. I need a flight from San Diego to Anchorage on May 1 at 8 am.

14. What flights are available from Dallas to Houston at 8 am, July 3?

15. Can you get me on a flight from Washington, DC/National airport to Philadelphia on October 28, leaving around 2 pm?

MORE ON AVAILABILITY AND DISPLAYING SCHEDULES

There are many entries that can be used when accessing schedules and availability. A few of the "shortcuts" were given previously. Some additional entries are listed below:

GENERALLY

S = Schedules

A = Availability

SDFWMSY1P--Schedules from Dallas/Ft. Worth to New Orleans (using the current date), departing at 1 p.m.

S14JUNBOSATLIOA-DL--Schedules on Jun. 14 from Boston to Atlanta at 10 a.m. on Delta only

S*--Display additional schedules

S**--Return to previous display

S 3P--Change time to 3 p.m.

S 18JUN--Change date to Jun. 18

S R--Return schedules--same date

S R19JUN--Return schedules on Jun. 19 (same time)

S R19JUN6P--Return schedules on Jun. 19 at 6 p.m.

NOTES

--
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Article Details
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Author:Dervaes, Claudine
Publication:Domestic Travel & Ticketing
Date:Jan 1, 2000
Words:4498
Previous Article:Chapter 2: The OAG * Desktop Flight Guide--North American Edition.
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