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Cake-selling students have Special Effect; School citizens.

GAMES development students at City College have been helping people with disabilities to play video games.

The BTEC Level 3 students have been raising money for Special Effect, a charity which gives young people with disabilities the opportunity to play computer games.

They sold home made cakes and set up a 'guess how many jelly beans are in the jar' challenge to raise money for the charity and are planning more activities through the academic year.

"All of us on the course love gaming; it's why we been drawn to studying games development," said City College student Ayrton Totten.

"Lots of young people though are effectively excluded by their disabilities.

Special Effect helps them achieve the same quality of life and enjoy gaming like everyone else. We wanted to support their work and so came up with this idea for raising money."

Special Effect assesses individuals in its national assessment centre and at home to understand their needs.

The charity also has an equipment library where people can trial the equipment, both hardware and software, so they can be sure that the equipment they buy suits their needs and environment. This includes chin and eye character movement and one-handed controllers Special Effect also designs equipment and runs an award-winning road show that enables people with disabilities to discover the fun, friendship and inclusion of computer gaming.

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Ayrton Totten, tutor Shoubna Naika-Patel, Elle Knaggs and (back) Jarrod Oldham sold cakes to raise money for the Special Effect charity
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Coventry Evening Telegraph (England)
Date:Nov 14, 2013
Words:249
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