Printer Friendly

CYTOTHERAPEUTICS REPORTS THERAPEUTIC DELIVERY OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR WITHIN BRAIN

 PROVIDENCE, R.I., Aug. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- CytoTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: CTII), announced today that Patrick Aebischer, M.D., Ph.D., a founding scientist of the company, and Diane Hoffman, a post-doctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, reported in the July edition of "Experimental Neurology" the delivery of biologically significant quantities of a recombinant nerve growth factor (NGF) from cell-containing capsules implanted within the brain. These implants, based on CytoTherapeutics' CRIB(TM) (cellular replacement by immunoisolatory biocapsule) encapsulation technologies, allow the delivery of large proteins, such as NGF, within the central nervous system (CNS), thereby avoiding difficulties of transporting these molecules across the blood/brain barrier. Following the encapsulation of genetically engineered cells within selectively permeable membranes and placement of these capsules at a specific site within the brain, the researchers observed strong evidence of a neuroprotective effect resulting from the neurotrophic factor released by the capsule.
 "NGF is one of a family of neurotrophic factors that previous studies have shown may play a critical role in the treatment of CNS disorders by preventing or reversing neuronal cell loss, which is characteristic of neurodegenerative disorders," said Aebischer. "Because we have been able to demonstrate that growth factors can be successfully delivered by encapsulating factor-producing cells and implanting them directly within the brain, we may significantly increase the potential applications of these growth factors in the treatment of numerous CNS diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, ALS and Parkinson's disease. We are also pleased to report that the compound delivered in this study is one of the largest substances that has been delivered by cell-containing capsules into a host species," added Aebischer.
 In the research paradigm utilized by the investigators, delivery of NGF to a region of the brain, termed the lateral ventricle of fimbria-fornix, prevented lesion-induced reduction of neuronal cell activity in an animal model that normally occurs following the lesion. This fimbria-fornix model is considered relevant to the evaluation of new treatments of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders.
 Encapsulated cell therapy has been successfully shown to deliver compounds such as insulin, dopamine and catecholamines, which are much smaller than NGF. One of the technical advances underlying the achievement reported in "Experimental Neurology" was the ability to design an implant capable of secreting molecules as large as NGF without the loss of the immunoisolatory effect. The immunoisolatory effect is provided by the CRIB(TM) based implants that are designed to enable nutrients and oxygen to pass through to sustain the cells within the capsule, while shielding the cells from the host's immune system. The encapsulation technology was co-invented by Aebischer and has been licensed to CytoTherapeutics for use in the company's product development programs.
 "This study reported by Drs. Aebischer and Hoffman is a further milestone in our development of proprietary products combining gene- altered cells and delivery of therapeutic products via or selectively permeable capsules," said Seth A. Rudnick, M.D., chairman and chief executive officer at CytoTherapeutics. "Their successful delivery of biologically active agents within the brain will critically impact our work in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, ALS and Alzheimer's" he added.
 CytoTherapeutics is a leader in the development and commercial application of implantable delivery systems for biologically active and gene therapy products for the treatment of major diseases of the CNS and other chronic disorders. The company's CNS products in development include its CereCRIB(TM) implant for the treatment of severe, chronic pain, and its NeuroCRIB(TM) implant for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. CytoTherapeutics is also developing its EndoCRIB(TM) implant for the treatment of Type I diabetes.
 -0- 8/2/93
 /CONTACT: Thomas G. Wiggans of CytoTherapeutics, 401-272-3310/
 (CTII)


CO: CytoTherapeutics ST: Rhode Island IN: MTC SU:

JL -- NE013 -- 8400 08/02/93 13:19 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Aug 2, 1993
Words:629
Previous Article:COGNOS AND SON SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL ANNOUNCE A STAR COLLABORATION
Next Article:K-III BUYS THREE TRADE MAGAZINES FROM WEISNER; PUBLICATIONS FOCUSED ON SCREEN PRINTING AND EMBROIDERY TO BE PART OF INTERTEC UNIT
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters