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CYTOTHERAPEUTICS' DEMONSTRATES FIRST DELIVERY OF HUMAN NERVE GROWTH FACTOR VIA ENCAPSULATED XENOGENEIC CELL IN PRIMATE MODEL OF ALZHEIMER'S

Preclinical Studies Also Show Delivery of Neurotrophic Factors with
 Potential Therapeutic Application in Parkinson's and
 Huntington's Diseases
 PROVIDENCE, R.I., Oct. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- CytoTherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: CTII) announced today that E. Edward Baetge, Ph.D., its director of Neuroscience at the company, reported the successful delivery of human nerve growth factor (NGF) across the blood/brain barrier from cell-containing capsules implanted in the brain in a primate model relevant to Alzheimer's disease. The results of the study demonstrate protection from growth-factor deprived loss of cholinergic neurons in a region of the brain linked to memory deficiencies associated with Alzheimer's disease. Baetge presented the study results at the Conference on Neurodegenerative Diseases: Advances in Therapeutic Development in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., sponsored by International Business Communications.
 "We have recently demonstrated in analogous rodent models that human NGF delivery from encapsulated xenogeneic (cross-species) cells prevents neuronal cell loss characteristic of neurodegenerative disorders. With our successful delivery of human NGF in a primate, we have moved closer to human clinical applicability with our encapsulation technology," said Baetge. "What is most important about these results is the potential of our CRIB(TM) technology to deliver multiple neurotransmitter and trophic factors directly into the central nervous system (CNS) without the use of immunosuppression and within a fully retrievable implant," he added.
 CytoTherapeutics also reported results from the company's ongoing primate efficacy studies of its NeuroCRIB(TM) implant for Parkinson's disease. In these studies, the company and its collaborators showed behavioral improvements in MPTP primate models of Parkinson's disease utilizing CytoTherapeutics' dopamine-secreting implant. In addition, a study of a rodent model of Huntington's disease utilizing the company's CRIB technology to deliver NGF showed behavioral and anatomical improvements, demonstrating human NGF-delivery in another xenogeneic transplant model.
 "These animal studies demonstrate that our proprietary encapsulation technology enables us to deliver a variety of neurotrophic factor-producing cells which may offer substantial improvement in the treatment of an increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases," said Seth A. Rudnick, M.D., chairman and chief executive officer at CytoTherapeutics. "The successful delivery in these animal studies of human-relevant neurotrophic agents within the brain, without immunosuppression, has strengthened all of our ongoing research and development of products for diseases of the CNS, including Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease."
 CytoTherapeutics' encapsulated cell therapy has been used to deliver compounds such as enkephalins and catecholamines in its ongoing human clinical trial for chronic pain. These molecules are significantly smaller than neurotrophic factors. One of the technical advances underlying the achievements reported by scientists at CytoTherapeutics was the ability to design an implant capable of secreting stable therapeutic levels of protein molecules as large as or larger than NGF without loss of the immunoisolatory effect. The immunoisolatory effect is provided by the CRIB-based implants which are designed to enable nutrients and oxygen to pass through the wall of the implant to sustain the cells within the capsule, while shielding the cells from the host's immune system and allowing them to secrete relevant therapeutic agents.
 CytoTherapeutics is a leader in the development of implantable delivery systems for biologically active and gene therapy products for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and other chronic disorders. The company's CNS products in development include its CereCRIB(TM) implant for the treatment of severe, chronic pain and its NeuroCRIB implant for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The company is also developing applications of its CRIB technology for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, as well as other neurodegenerative diseases.
 -0- 10/6/93
 /CONTACT: Seth A. Rudnick, M.D., chief executive officer, 401-272-3310 ext. 2113 or Elizabeth Razee, communications coordinator, 401-272-3310 ext. 2132, both of CytoTherapeutics, Inc./


CO: CytoTherapeutics ST: Rhode Island IN: MTC SU: PDT

SJ-CM -- NE010 -- 9411 10/06/93 14:46 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 6, 1993
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