Printer Friendly

CSUN RELIVES DESIGNS OF THE PAST.

Byline: Robert Monroe Staff Writer

NORTHRIDGE - It's a tall order in the land of ranch houses, but an exhibit at California State University, Northridge beckons visitors to look beyond the boxy designs that surround us.

The students participating in ``Design 2000: Designers of the Future'' got their home and office design ideas from sporting arenas, from nature and, most significantly from the past. The student designers said they looked back to established styles just as much as they envisioned what the future will bring.

``On the one hand, I think technology will play a major role. Homes will be more energy efficient,'' said Roberta Mauksch, associate professor of Family Environmental Sciences and adviser to the design expo, ``but at the same time people need links to the past.''

Graduate student Amy Strong agrees.

``That's why retro always comes back but always with an edge,'' said Strong, whose sketches include airy, high-ceilinged home interiors where the style comes closest to art deco but not quite.

``I wanted to create a place where you really couldn't tell what time period it was,'' Strong said.

The exhibit is the first since a 1998 show the CSUN interior design program staged to help acquire the accreditation that allows students to go for their licenses only two years after graduation. The program won the coveted accreditation from the Foundation for Interior Design Education Research, making it the only four-year program at a public Southern California university to have that recognition.

``Right now we are the only game in town,'' Mauksch said.

Thirty of 60 declared interior design majors are showing works selected by Mauksch in the juried exhibit.

Rolando Serrano, a senior, drew the design of his ``dream house'' taking a nod from the Los Angeles Coliseum. The oval-shaped house includes bedrooms around the sides and in the center, the living room and kitchen all become part of the ``arena.'' The focal point of the living room is a fireplace but there's still room for a television.

``Most houses today are pretty much square, (but) in the future they're going to have much geometrical designs,'' he predicted, thinking current designers will take their cues from the work of architects such as Frank Gehry.

DESIGN EXHIBIT

Design 2000: Designers of the Future shows through Saturday at the Grand Salon of the University Student Union, California State University, Northridge. The free exhibit is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

CAPTION(S):

photo, box

Photo: Students examine office and living designs during the Design 2000: Designers of the Future exhibit at CSUN.

John McCoy/Staff Photographer

Box: DESIGN EXHIBIT (see text)
COPYRIGHT 2000 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2000, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Mar 22, 2000
Words:437
Previous Article:ICE CREAM VENDOR TAKEN INTO CUSTODY FOR CHILD ANNOYING.
Next Article:L.A. ROADS AMONG WORST.


Related Articles
DO YOU BELIEVE IN MATADORS? CSUN UPSETS UCLA, 78-74, IN WESTWOOD.
NORTHRIDGE OVERWHELMS OUTMANNED NAIA FOE CSUN 96, VANGUARD 51.
CSUN NOTEBOOK: FUND-RAISING POLICY A HINDRANCE.
CSUN'S OTHER QBS ARE WINGS IN WAITING.
CSUN GETS SANDOVAL.
CSUN PUTS BRAKES ON ENROLLMENT.
QUAKE SIGNS DIMINISHING AT UNIVERSITY; CSUN REFRESHED FOR FRESHMEN.
[0] MATADORS LOSE THEIR WAY; CSUN STUMBLES AT SACRAMENTO : SACRAMENTO STATE 35, CSUN 21.
CSUN FISHING FOR LINEMEN.
CULTURE IN THE VALLEY; REVAMPED CSUN EMERGING AS GATHERING PLACE.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters