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CRYOMEDICAL SCIENCES' ACCUPROBE IS USED SUCCESSFULLY IN PROSTATE SURGERY AT UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CANCER CENTER

 CRYOMEDICAL SCIENCES' ACCUPROBE IS USED SUCCESSFULLY IN
 PROSTATE SURGERY AT UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CANCER CENTER
 ROCKVILLE, Md., Aug. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: CMSI) announced today that following the successful use of its minimally invasive AccuProbe system of cryosurgery recently to treat prostate cancer patients, the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston expects to treat 50 more prostate cancer patients with the AccuProbe system this year. The hospital recently began using AccuProbe cryosurgery to treat prostate cancer patients who initially failed other therapies and are at an advanced state of their disease.
 As reported earlier, Cryomedical sciences shipped the AccuProbe to Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, where a prototype system has been used in the treatment of 95 prostate cancers, 26 liver cancers, five lung cancers, two brain cancers and one eye cancer since October 1991; as well as to the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, where AccuProbe has been used in treating five patients with prostate cancer.
 Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. is a biomedical firm engaged in the development of products in the field of hypothermic (low temperature) medicine.
 Following is the text of the release issued Aug. 12 by M.D. Anderson Cancer Center on its plans to use AccuProbe:
 SURGICAL TECHNIQUE GIVES NEW HOPE TO PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS
 HOUSTON -- An improved technique first developed about 5,000 years ago is giving new hope for advance stage prostate cancer patients at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.
 The technique is called cryosurgery, a minimally invasive treatment that uses a device to freeze and destroy cancerous tumors. M.D. Anderson recently began using cryosurgery to treat prostate Cancer patients who initially failed other therapies and are at an advanced stage of their disease.
 "Cryosurgery offers these individuals the opportunity to completely eradicate their cancer," said Dr. Douglas Johnson, professor in the Department of Urology at M.D. Anderson. "It's the difference between simply controlling or possibly getting rid of a malignant tumor."
 Cryosurgery involves inserting a hollow metal tubular device called a cryoprobe through the skin into a cancerous tumor. This device, which contains super-cooled liquid nitrogen circulating through its tip, freezes the tumor to -300 F in about 15 minutes. Upon completion of the procedure the device is withdrawn and the body absorbs the dead tissue over time. Surgeons may use up to five separate probes to destroy large or multiple tumors.
 Freezing body parts as treatment for ailments or disease is nothing new. Archaeologists know that the use of ice as anesthesia for surgery was first described in about 3500 B.C. Surgeons currently use cryosurgery to treat easy-to-reach areas such as the eyes, skin and cervix. However, recent technological advances allow the use of ultrasound imaging to more accurately monitor the placement of cryoprobes inside the body. Surgeons now can destroy cancerous tumors located in major internal organs and glands and avoid touching surrounding healthy tissue.
 The device recently was developed and patented by Cryomedical Sciences, Inc., a biomedical firm headquartered in Rockville, which specializes in products for use in low-temperature medicine. M.D. Anderson is one of the first two medical institutions in the country to receive this stat-of-the-art cryosurgical device.
 Conventional therapies for prostate cancer include surgery of radiotherapy if the cancer is detected early. "M.D. Anderson physicians have traditionally used radiation therapy and hormonal therapy as the principal treatment for controlling advanced cases of prostate cancer," Johnson said. "The potential complications involved with major surgery are often too great to risk it.
 "The minimally invasive procedure enables patients to resume normal activities within 48 hours, compared to four-five weeks if a surgeon opted to perform conventional prostatectomy," he added.
 To date, more than 80 prostate cancer patients around the country have been treated using the new therapy. Urologists at M.D. Anderson expect to provide the procedure to 50 M.D. Anderson prostate cancer patients this year alone. Cryosurgery also has shown promise treating patients with inoperable cancers of the liver, pancreas, brain and other organs.
 One of every 11 men will develop prostate cancer during his lifetime. The most common cancer found in men, it will strike more than 132,000 this year and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men. It is disease in which malignant cells are found in the prostate, one of the male sex glands located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum.
 "Thanks to the new technology, we can offer hope to patients whose tumors were formerly inoperable or who could not be treated effectively with hormonal therapy. Cure is now a possibility for these men," Johnson said.
 -0- 8/14/92
 /CONTACT: J.J. Finkelstein, president and CEO of Cryomedical Sciences, 301-417-7070, or Marianne Stewart or Jerry Miller of the Financial Relations Board, 212-661-8030, for Cryomedical Sciences/
 (CMSI) CO: Cryomedical Sciences, Inc. ST: Maryland IN: MTC SU:


TS-CK -- NY038 -- 0014 08/14/92 12:31 EDT
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