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CREATE OWN BREAKTHROUGH TO GAIN NEW EMPLOYMENT, JOBLESS URGED YOU CAN FIND A NEW JOB NOW

 CREATE OWN BREAKTHROUGH TO GAIN NEW EMPLOYMENT,
 JOBLESS URGED YOU CAN FIND A NEW JOB NOW
 NEW YORK, Dec. 31 /PRNewswire/ -- Over 2,000 workers who sought job search advice in a free national call-in were advised to create their own breakthrough by concentrating on the positives of their skills and abilities in seeking new work.
 Focusing on the strongest presentation of themselves to prospective employers is the best way to allay fears about whether they will get a new job, identified as the number one workplace issue by the majority who called.
 Jobless workers as well as some currently employed responded in the sixth annual free national job search call-in conducted through New Year's Eve by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., an international outplacement consulting firm.
 "Many of the jobless callers wondered aloud that even if they did get a new job, how long would it last. They look around them and see the impact of more layoffs," said James E. Challenger, president of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. (708-446-0904).
 "The lack of confidence expressed reflects the low level of consumer confidence being reported in the latest national business surveys. Caution and fear about finding a job are clearly factors in obstructing economic recovery, and are literally impeding individuals from finding new jobs," he continued.
 "However, jobs are available for those who know how to tailor presentation of themselves to the needs of employers, despite the dire circumstances depicted by some pundits.
 "We listened to a lot of real concern about taking any job just to put food on the table.
 "Clearly, people have to do what is needed to maintain their lives but we strongly urged that they vigorously pursue a new position in their job function, convinced that they could obtain an equal or better paying job.
 "Employers fill positions from salary schedules and generally are not seeking to hire at lower rates than those schedules. Do not offer to work for less. You create doubts about your own perspective of your capabilities," Challenger said his counselors advised callers.
 "Partners in law and architectural firms, CPA's and others in the professions were among the callers.
 "There is a lot of uncertainty and thrashing around; people just do not know what to do. Some simply, incorrectly, imagine they can get a new job at all. Our telephone lines were never without a call," Challenger said.
 "When they were appraised of basic job search techniques, such as how to contact employers and what to say in an employment interview, many concluded their calls with a positive, upbeat attitude," he said.
 Challenger said other highlights of the survey of callers included:
 25 percent said they were employed but sought advice about keeping their job because they were so concerned about their own job security.
 "To many of the employed callers, there is no real sense of job security anymore. We heard that expressed over and over," he observed.
 "Our experience has shown that employees create their own job security by the quality of their performance on the job: it is the only real job security."
 35 percent of the callers said they would be willing to move for a new job. "I do not particularly like the prospect but it appears to be the only way I can get another job," was a typical comment.
 "In discussing the options of whether to move for a job, our counselors pointed out that people who expand the scope of their job search also expand their possibilities of finding new employment."
 People who said their salary range was $50,000 - $70,000 represented the highest number in that income category in the six-year history of the call-in, indicating a high level of the white collar job seekers.
 People with longer job tenures ranging from 14 to 17 to as high as 20 years on their last job were among the callers.
 "That is a definite contrast to the recession of the early 1980s when more people with shorter job tenures were among the unemployed," Challenger said.
 "Those with longer tenures have the strength of experience, a very desirable commodity to employers today. Employers are seeking people with the experience to help lead the company into recovery. It is a big plus in finding a new situation."
 Many callers equated switching industries for a new job with changing careers.
 "One respondent had been in home furnishings sales most of his life and wanted to know if he should 'change careers' by getting a sales job in a different industry," Challenger said. "He was advised that staying in sales is not career changing, but represents utilizing one's functional skills in a different industry."
 Another jobless caller identified himself as a certified public accountant who had worked in real estate development and felt that no one outside of real estate would be interested in him. "We pointed out that his financial and accounting skills are needed by all businesses and industries," he said.
 Challenger said the average age of the call-in respondents was in the 30s and 40s. Their average salary on their last job was between $30,000 and $40,000.
 Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., counsels discharged persons from across the nation, primarily from Fortune 1000 companies. The firm's extensive business base enables it to determine and measure significant national trends and developments in the job market. The company is the nation's oldest outplacement company. It has counseled more than 20,000 discharged people since its founding in the 1960s. Headquartered in Chicago, it maintains 16 regional offices in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Nashville, Philadelphia, St. Louis, New York/Stamford, Montreal, Canada and elsewhere internationally.
 -0- 12/31/91
 /CONTACT: James E. Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, 312-332-5790/ CO: Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc. ST: New York IN: SU:


PS -- NY039 -- 5969 12/31/91 17:51 EST
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Date:Dec 31, 1991
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