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CORRECTION TO EARLIER IMMUNIZATIONS SOON TO BE REQUIRED NATIONWIDE

 /C O R R E C T I O N -- PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE/
 In NYHFNS15, Earlier Immunizations Soon to be Required


Nationwide, moved Tuesday, July 21, we are advised by the Public Health Service that the first graph, third line, should read "to be immunized against measles, rubella and polio," rather than "measles, mumps, rubella and polio," as originally issued.
 The Public Health Service notes that at last count, seven states -- Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Maryland, New Mexico, Vermont and West Virginia -- do not require immunization against mumps.
 The first section of the corrected release follows:
 EARLIER IMMUNIZATIONS SOON TO BE REQUIRED NATIONWIDE
 WASHINGTON, July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- All 50 states will soon require children entering day care programs -- not just kindergarten or first grade -- to be immunized against measles, rubella and polio.
 According to the U.S. Public Health Service, this PHS recommendation will become effective nationwide now that a new immunization act has been approved in Nebraska.
 All states already require day care youngsters to have shots for diphtheria and tetanus, and all but Kentucky and Maine require shots for pertussis (whooping cough). Protection against both diseases and tetanus is usually provided simultaneously via the "DTP" shot.
 Only 31 states require the HIB vaccination, but PHS strongly recommends it. It protects against a bacterial infection that often sweeps through day care centers, sometimes causing meningitis, retardation and death.
 While no state requires Hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), the PHS also recommends this shot. Hepatitis is transmitted sexually and in blood -- like AIDS -- but is more prevalent. Infected mothers transmit it to infants at birth.
 State laws notwithstanding, PHS urges parents to take the initiative to make certain their youngsters have all of these shots and have them early enough -- some at two months or earlier.
 "When children receive vaccinations at the ages recommended, it can save them from disability, retardation, disease and death," said James Mason, M.D., head of the Public Health Service. And he adds: "By the time they reach 2, only 40 to 60 percent of our kids have been properly immunized. As parents and health officials, we've got to do a lot better."
 Mason said it's important for parents to keep the state's standard immunization record given them by their medical provider and to bring it with them for updating each time shots are given. This record -- especially critical if parents use more than one medical facility -- will be needed when youngsters enter day or grade school.
 But as a reminder to schedule their youngsters' shots, Mason urges parents to clip and post the table below.
 Age DTP Poliomyelitis MMR
 Birth
 1-2 months
 2 months X X
 4 months X X
 6 months X
 6-18 months
 12 months
 15 months X X X
 4-6 years
 (before school entry) X X X
 HIB HBV
 Age Option 1 Option 2 Option 1 Option 2
 Birth X
 1-2 months X X
 2 months X X
 4 months X X X
 6 months X
 6-18 months X X
 12 months X
 15 months X
 4-6 years
 (before school entry)
 -0- 7/22/92


CO: Public Health Service ST: District of Columbia IN: HEA SU:

DC -- NYHFNS15A -- 2035 07/22/92 14:56 EDT
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Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jul 22, 1992
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