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CORNING CATALYTIC CONVERTER BEATS 1997 EMISSIONS STANDARDS USING 12-VOLT BATTERY AND NO PRE-HEAT

 DETROIT, March 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Corning Incorporated (NYSE: GLW) reported today that its newest prototype electrically heated catalytic converter easily beat California's 1997 emission standards in recent independent laboratory tests using a single 12-volt battery and no pre-heat -- conditions considered essential to automobile manufacturers for a viable cold-start solution.
 The company said the new prototype reached 400 degrees C in 5 seconds. It did so using 85 percent less energy and one-third the power of the prototype introduced by Corning at last year's Society of Automotive Engineers annual conference in Detroit.
 The converter required 3.8 kilowatts of power and 6 watt hours of energy to produce grams-per-mile emission levels of 0.017 for non- methane hydrocarbons, 0.62 for carbon monoxide, and 0.16 for oxides of nitrogen. California's 1997 ultra-low emissions vehicle (ULEV) standards are 0.04, 1.7, and 0.2, respectively.
 According to Corning's project manager, Satish Duggal, the company achieved the improved results by reducing the mass of the metal substrate, and by redesigning the prototype to use a small-diameter heated metal substrate coupled with a small-diameter ceramic light-off substrate.
 "We are convinced that with further refinements our converter will not require a dedicated battery or pre-heat before ignition," Duggal said. "We have reason to be optimistic. We have already demonstrated in our own tests that we can achieve the 1997 standards with less than 2 kilowatts. In addition, we have seen recent emissions test results of our prototype from auto companies that are even better than the results from the independent laboratory."
 The electrically heated catalytic converter was developed at Corning's research laboratory to reduce emissions in the first two minutes of operation, when most of an automobile's pollutants are emitted unchecked. Exhaust gases enter the converter and are heated by a monolithic honeycomb substrate made from extruded powdered metals. The bulk of the emissions are then converted by the ceramic light-off substrate and main converter substrate. All three substrates are coated with precious-metal catalysts.
 -0- 3/1/93
 /CONTACT: R.W. DeMallie, 607-974-8778, or J.R. Jones, 607-974-4898, both of Corning Incorporated/
 (GLW)


CO: Corning Incorporated ST: Michigan, New York IN: AUT SU:

ML -- DE026 -- 1355 03/01/93 11:12 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 1, 1993
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