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CONSUMER SURVEY REVEALS HOW PEOPLE REALLY FEEL ABOUT DO-IT-YOURSELF PROJECTS INVOLVING CONCRETE

 CONSUMER SURVEY REVEALS HOW PEOPLE REALLY FEEL
 ABOUT DO-IT-YOURSELF PROJECTS INVOLVING CONCRETE
 ATLANTA, June 5 /PRNewswire/ -- The Quikrete Companies, a North American leader in packaged concrete products, recently conducted a nationwide consumer research survey to find out what consumers really think about do-it-yourself projects involving concrete.
 This survey is the first of its kind to be commissioned by a concrete manufacturer.
 The survey found that different emotional motivations influence people to undertake do-it-yourself concrete projects, including building self-esteem, solving a problem, bonding with others, validation of gender, protecting and nurturing loved ones, protecting and defending one's territory, and dominating others and the environment.
 One consumer built a ramp for his wheelchair-bound mother because he had several bad experiences trying to maneuver her up the crumbling steps and grassy slope at his weekend cabin. He completed the project because he was protecting a loved one from harm.
 Another consumer, who was aggravated by debris blowing over from a neighboring unoccupied lot, built a fence to keep the debris away from his property. By doing this, he dominated his environment.
 The survey found that consumers must overcome several hurdles before starting a concrete do-it-yourself project. These hurdles include:
 -- fear that they cannot afford it;
 -- fear that they face the project alone;
 -- fear of doing substandard work;
 -- fear that others won't approve;
 -- fear of the unknown, never done it before.
 Certain influencing factors help consumers overcome these fears:
 -- if there is someone who will help them undertake a project;
 -- if they don't do this project, they may be placing themselves,
 loved ones or their home in danger;
 -- if they knew how satisfied they would feel after they completed
 the project;
 -- if there is someone who can walk them through a project using
 concrete -- from product selection to project instructions;
 -- if they knew how easy it was to work with concrete.
 According to this survey, many consumers do overcome these hurdles, because eight out of 10 owner-occupied households reported working on some type of concrete project in the last five years. The most frequently mentioned projects were:
 -- 39 percent: anchoring mailboxes, swing sets/jungle gyms and
 basketball goals;
 -- 35 percent: setting posts for decks and fences;
 -- 29 percent: laying tile, brick, stone and concrete block;
 -- 28 percent: repairing cracks in the sidewalks, driveways and
 patios;
 -- 26 percent: pouring slabs for patios, steps, walkways and
 outbuildings.
 The survey divided the consumers it questioned into the following three categories:
 -- 26 percent: novice, they complete simple projects with simple
 tools;
 -- 50 percent: intermediate, they undertake a variety of projects,
 usually when something needs to be repaired;
 -- 24 percent: expert, they liked the challenges of home
 improvement, own a variety of tools, and there's no limit to what
 they can do.
 Some interesting statistics found in this study:
 -- 45 percent of the consumers had help from family or friends on
 their last project;
 -- 84 percent of consumers have worked on a do-it-yourself project
 in the last five years;
 -- 40 percent of consumers fear that projects won't look as good as
 they want them to.
 The survey was conducted by Moore & Symons, Inc., of Atlanta. The first component of the survey was vision interviews that identified the range of feelings, attitudes and opinions about concrete usage. These one-on-one interviews were recruited and scheduled with 10 people: four non-users with a potential concrete project need, and six light-users who had recently completed a concrete project. The second and final component was a consumer segmentation study that consisted of 400 phone interviews among a nationwide, random sample of homeowners under the age of 65. This segmented the consumer concrete market based on project type, message appeal and demographic target. The study took place between February and April 1992.
 -0- 6/5/92
 /CONTACT: Sharon McLaren of Julie Davis Associates, 404-231-0660, for Quikrete/ CO: The Quikrete Companies ST: Georgia IN: HOU SU:


EA-BR -- ATFNS1 -- 7298 06/05/92 07:32 EDT
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No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Date:Jun 5, 1992
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