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CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REPORTS ON ITS STUDY USING NEW METHOD OF PREVENTING ACCIDENTAL POISONINGS IN CHILDREN

     CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION REPORTS ON ITS STUDY USING
      NEW METHOD OF PREVENTING ACCIDENTAL POISONINGS IN CHILDREN
    MONTVALE, N.J., Dec. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Research using Bitrex(R) brand bittering agent and other aversive agents will be performed to determine their effectiveness in deterring accidental poisonings, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).  The commission reported this and other findings in its one-year status report of the two-year study it is performing on the use of aversive agents.
    The commission began studying the issue one year ago as a result of a request by the U.S. Congress.  Congress asked the commission to study whether household, garden and automotive chemical products should include an aversive agent to help deter against accidental ingestions. The study is to determine if national legislation is necessary to require manufacturers to include an aversive agent in select hazardous chemicals used in the home.
    "While the CPSC studies this issue, many companies have already formulated their household chemical products to include Bitrex," said Mitchell Tracy, marketing manager of Henley Chemicals, U.S. distributor of Bitrex.  "In addition to child-resistant closures and safe handling and storage of chemicals, aversive agents provide a final barrier against accidental poisonings.  Over 40,000 retail outlets now carry products with the Bitrex logo."
    Bitrex is used throughout Europe in products ranging from antifreeze to household cleaning and garden chemicals.
    Several consumer and safety organizations in the U.S., including the National Safety Council, American Medical Association, and the American Association of Poison Control Centers, have recommended the addition of Bitrex as an additional safety measure.
    The commission plans to present the complete results of its study to Congress by Nov. 15, 1992, as required in Section 204 of the Consumer Product Safety Commission Act of 1990.  The act requires the commission to conduct a study on the use of aversive agents, as reported in the Federal Register, Vol. 56, No. 126.; July 1, 1991.
    -0-              12/20/91
    /CONTACT:  Mitchell Tracy of Henley Chemicals, 201-307-0422 or 800-635-3558, or Brad Miles of Ted Klein & Co., 212-477-9007, for Henley/ CO:  Henley Chemicals ST:  New Jersey IN:  CHM SU: FC-OS -- NY001 -- 4211 12/20/91 08:00 EST
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Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Dec 20, 1991
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