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CONFECTIONERY GIFT-GIVING TO REACH RECORD HIGH THIS EASTER

 CONFECTIONERY GIFT-GIVING TO REACH RECORD HIGH THIS EASTER
 NEW YORK, April 15 /PRNewswire/ -- More Americans than ever before


plan to give confectionery as a gift this Easter, according to a recent national survey.(A) As a result, confectionery industry experts predict Easter confectionery sales will reach a record $864 million in 1992.
 The survey, conducted by Response Analysis Corporation (RAC) for the National Confectioners Association (NCA), found that 61 percent of the candy-consuming households polled plan to celebrate this Easter season with gifts of confectionery -- a three percent increase over a 1989 survey.
 Significant differences between men and women's gift-giving intentions for the holiday were also revealed in the national survey. While the majority of both groups plan to give confectionery this Easter, 66 percent of women versus 59 percent of men are likely to give confectionery as a gift. The number of women who intend to give confectionery increased by 7 percent over the 1989 survey.
 The 1991 survey also indicates that younger respondents are the most likely to give confectionery gifts at Easter. In fact, 79 percent of those respondents 18-to-34 years old plan to give confectionery versus 38 percent of those 55 years old and up.
 "The survey reveals that the tradition of giving confectionery at Easter is stronger than ever," says Richard T. O'Connell, president of the National Confectioners Association. O'Connell adds, "With more and more people enjoying their Easter confectionery, the good news is that confectionery can be enjoyed as part of a healthy lifestyle."
 Industry experts attribute the increase in confectionery gift-giving partly to heightened awareness among nutrition savvy consumers, that confectionery can fit into a healthy active lifestyle.
 "People are beginning to realize that confectionery is lower in fat, calories, cholesterol and sodium than many other snack-food products, and can be enjoyed as part of a healthy eating plan," according to nutritionist Annette Natow, Ph.D., R.D., co-author of "The Fat Counter" and "The Fat Attack Plan."
 Consumer who wish to learn more about confectionery and nutrition can receive a free brochure that lists the fat, calorie, cholesterol and sodium levels of popular confectionery products by sending a self- addressed, stamped envelope to:
 The Sweet Truth About Confectionery
 450 Park Ave. South, Suite 600
 New York, N.Y. 10016
 (A) The survey, conducted on behalf of the U.S. confectionery industry in October 1991, is based on a national probability sample of 500 adult Americans, with a variance of positive/negative 4 percent.
 -0- 4/15/92
 /CONTACT: Russel Cheek or Sue Bloomberg of Ogilvy Adams & Rinehart, 212-951-5442, for National Confectioners Association/ CO: National Confectioners Association ST: New York IN: FOD SU:


SM-OS -- NY037 -- 8625 04/15/92 11:04 EDT
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Date:Apr 15, 1992
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