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CONCERNS RISING: WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS?

 OAKLAND, Calif., Feb. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Recent publicity over an outbreak of illness in the Northwest caused by contaminated, undercooked meat has raised public concern over food-borne illnesses. These concerns have broadened with warnings that food contamination is not limited to stores or restaurants, or to a few types of food, but that it extends to the home and involves food preparation practices. People are not immune to illnesses caused by common bacteria, reinforcing the need to disinfect to help prevent illness.
 The Centers for Disease Control estimates that there are at least six million cases of food-borne disease in the United States each year. The toll need not be so high. The risk of food-borne illness could be greatly reduced if people were more aware of simple steps they could take in the home to prevent the spread of salmonella and other food- borne bacteria.
 Although four out of five U.S. households have bleach, it's a little-known fact that a simple solution of sodium hypochlorite bleach (liquid laundry bleach) and water used on surfaces following cleaning provides a safe, inexpensive and extremely effective defense against a variety of harmful food-borne organisms that can spread via food surfaces -- including common threats such as salmonella and E. coli.
 In the kitchen, for instance, cutting boards and other surfaces should be cleaned and sanitized regularly -- particularly when in contact with raw meats and poultry. Soap and water alone won't do the job, nor will suggested alternatives such as vinegar and baking soda.
 The Clorox Company (NYSE: CLX) is stepping up its campaign to educate the public about the need to disinfect in the home to help prevent illness. The campaign highlights the disinfecting and sanitizing characteristics of Clorox's products. Clorox is the largest U.S. producer of household cleaning products, many of which are bleach- based. Copies of new ads, featured as part of this campaign, are available upon request.
 Sandy Sullivan, 510-271-7732, or Mike Riley, 510-271-4980, representatives of The Clorox Company's environment and safety team, are available to answer any questions you may have on preventative care in the home or other related issues of interest to you.
 Directions for sanitizing food contact surfaces to kill bacteria: First wash with hot, sudsy water. Rinse. Then apply a solution of three tablespoons bleach (slightly less than 1/4 cup) per gallon of water to surfaces. Reapply the solution as needed to keep the surfaces wet for at least two minutes. Wipe excess with clean cloth and air dry.
 -0- 2/19/93
 /CONTACT: Sandy Sullivan, 510-271-7732, or Mike Riley, 510-271-4980, both of The Clorox Company/
 (CLX)


CO: Clorox Company ST: California IN: HOU SU:

TM-LD -- NY005 -- 8265 02/19/93 08:30 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 19, 1993
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