Printer Friendly

COMPANY FORMED TO TEST AND SELL HOPKINS CPR DEVICE

 BALTIMORE, Dec. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- A Baltimore-based company has formed to test and eventually mass-produce a new device designed by Johns Hopkins scientists to take the guesswork out of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and save the lives of more cardiac arrest victims.
 CardioLogic Systems Inc., will manufacture an inflatable vest that eliminates the need for manual compression of the chest to restart the heart and maintain blood flow after a cardiac arrest.
 The company signed an agreement with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and faculty inventors in December. Testing and manufacturing could bring an estimated 50 jobs to the Baltimore area within the next two to three years, the company said.
 An outgrowth of more than a decade of study at Hopkins, where modern CPR was invented, the vest will undergo a multicenter clinical trial in the summer of 1993 with an initial group of 50 vest systems.
 In addition to announcing the formation of the company, Hopkins officials also report the venture is an unprecedented move for the university into joint projects with the business community.
 Under a series of newly developed policies in the School of Medicine, the university and its faculty inventors are allowed to own stock in CardioLogic after review and approval by the dean and a faculty committee on conflict of interest.
 The policies extend the long-standing practice of permitting licensing fees and royalties to flow to the university and Hopkins scientists whose intellectual discoveries are transferred to the marketplace. The new policies cover stock ownership under provisions that prevent any sale of the stock by the university or faculty inventors until the product is well established in the marketplace. Such controls are aimed at eliminating the possibility that faculty inventors or the university can profit from insider information and timing of stock trading, officials said.
 "By forming regulations that require disclosure and prevent conflicts of interest, we believe we will be able to bring advances in knowledge to market, to benefit the public, faster," said David A. Blake, Ph.D., senior associate dean of the School of Medicine. "The new policies provide incentives for both the business community and our scientists, along with protections for our historic academic mission and obligations," he said.
 "CardioLogic is pleased to be in the vanguard of a new kind of venture," said company president and chief executive officer Jeff Keopsell. "Our plan is to base our operation in Baltimore. This is a model for good business decisions that bring new technologies to the people who need them."
 "We're all in agreement that win-win situations that bring venture capital and new ideas together can do a great deal to advance the development of basic discovery into improved health care in the U.S. and beyond," said Michael M.E. Johns, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine. "For us, the key challenge is to do so without compromising in any way our traditional roles and core values. Our new policies help us do that."
 The inflatable CPR vest is shaped like a large blood pressure cuff that wraps around the chest and replaces manual compression of the chest. Preliminary studies on animals and humans show that it can increase the amount of blood flow generated by CPR, which increases the number of hearts that are restarted.
 Since CPR was developed at Hopkins in 1958, many scientist have been trying to find ways to improve it. Hopkins scientist and technicians based the design of the device on new knowledge of what conventional CPR actually accomplished.
 Early experiments suggested that the key element in CPR was direct pressure on the heart. But investigators now know that it is increased pressure in the chest cavity, rather than direct manipulation of the heart, that moves blood to the rest of the body. CPR is a life-saving technique, but is successful only 15 percent of the time, they said. They are hopeful that the CPR vest will get the job done at least twice as often.
 According to Keopsell, the company initially will manufacture 50 vest systems to be used for further clinical testing under FDA guidelines. A multicenter trial will begin in the summer of 1993, he said. Should the studies confirm earlier studies, CardioLogic will move to wider-scale production and marketing upon the completion of FDA approval.
 Testing of an early version of the vest began on animals in 1981. In one study, seven of seven dogs given vest CPR survived without injury; only four of 14 given manual CPR survived.
 In 1987, the inventors introduced a newer vest for testing on humans that covers more chest area and maintains a small amount of pressure on the chest between compressions. It deflates completely only every fifth compression to allow the chest to expand for ventilation.
 In a recent abstract reported at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions in November 1992, investigators said the vest created blood pressure substantially greater than those produced by standard CPR and restarted the hearts of a number of individuals.
 Manual CPR was discovered serendipitously at Hopkins in the 1950s by G. Guy Knickerbocker, an electrical engineer testing another Hopkins invention -- a defibrillator, which shocks the heart into a regular rhythm through paddles placed on the patient's chest. While testing the device on dogs, he noticed that the animal's blood pressure rose from the weight of the paddles alone. Knickerbocker, along with William Kouwenhoven and James Jude, discovered that they could keep a cardiac- arrested dog alive by rhythmically pressing on its sternum with 80 pounds of force once every second for 10 minutes. On Feb. 15, 1958, the day after Valentine's Day, Hopkins surgeon Henry T. Bahnson successfully used the technique to revive a two-year-old child.
 /delval/
 -0- 12/21/92
 /Editors: For further information on Hopkins' revised Conflict of Interest Policy Guidelines and Regulations, call Joann Rodgers in the Office of Public Affairs, 410-955-6660 or David Blake, Ph.D., senior associate dean of the School of Medicine, 410-955-2411. For information about Hopkins' Office of Corporate Liaison or office of Technology Licensing, contact Joann Rodgers or Michele Fizzano in the Office of Public Affairs, 410-955-6680. For more information on CardioLogic, call Michele Fizzano or Joann Rodgers in the Office of Public Affairs, or after Jan. 11, Jeff Keopsell./
 /CONTACT: John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Office of Public Affairs, 410-955-6680/


CO: Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions; CardioLogic Systems Inc. ST: Maryland IN: MTC SU:

MJ-JS -- PH030 -- 0186 12/21/92 16:32 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Dec 21, 1992
Words:1074
Previous Article:STANDARD & POOR'S STOCK PRICE INDEX -- CLOSING, MONDAY, DEC. 21 /PRN/
Next Article:GOV. CASEY ANNOUNCES CUSTOMIZED JOB TRAINING GRANT
Topics:


Related Articles
BIO-IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES, INC. CEO JAMES J. CONKLIN, MD ELECTED AS A REGIONAL FINALIST IN 1993 ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR AWARDS
INNOVEX FORMS MEDICAL PRODUCTS GROUP
INNOVEX REPORTS RECORD FIRST-QUARTER EARNINGS
INNOVEX DECLARES QUARTERLY DIVIDEND INCREASE
Medtronic Begins Second Round of Studies for Stent Designed for Use in the Brain.
Study Shows AEDs Deployed in Public Places Doubles Survival of Cardiac Arrest Victims; Accelerated Growth in AED Market Expected.
Johns Hopkins testing 256-slice CT scanner.
Arrow International and Johns Hopkins Awarded Judgment Against Datascope in Patent Litigation.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters