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COMMUNICATIONS/ROBOTICS INROADS SPURRED BY SUPERCOMPUTERS IN JAPAN

 CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Thinking Machines today announced its latest supercomputer installation in Japan. The Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute in Kyoto will use the Connection Machine (CM-5) to further its development of intelligent communications systems. The Institute installed Japan's first massively parallel supercomputer, a Thinking Machines CM-2, in 1990.
 The CM-5 will significantly further the Institute's charter to advance the technology of intelligent communications systems, specifically of visual pattern and speech recognition through highly efficient, human friendly machine interfaces. The heaviest use of the Institute's two Connection Machines will be in artificial life, and in its Neural Net Group, using neural net models for rr Japan an important market , and as a company, Thinking Machines will continue to be very determined in its commitment to Japan," said Harvey Weiss, president of Thinking Machines Corporation.
 The CM-5 at the Institute is among four Connection Machines installed in Japan this year. Those installations also included the University of Tokyo, Japan Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (JAIST)-Hokuriku, and Kyushu University. Thinking Machines is scheduled to deliver more massively parallel supercomputers to additional sites this summer.
 At the University of Tokyo, the Connection Machine will support the university's medical department research on DNA components. And at one site slated for installation in August, the supercomputer will be used for environmental analysis and simulation applications.
 Previously, Thinking Machines supercomputers were installed at the Japanese Institute of Computational Fluid Dynamics (a CM-2 in April 1991), and the Real World Computing Partnership (a CM-5 in December 1992).
 Thinking Machines Corporation is the world leader in the design, development and manufacture of highly parallel supercomputers. The company's Connection Machine (CM-5) system is the most powerful supercomputer in the world. Thinking Machines, privately held, has office worldwide.
 /NOTE: Connection Machine is a registered trademark of Thinking Machines Corporation./
 -0- 6/7/93
 /CONTACT: Martha Keeley of Thinking Machines, 617-234-5502; or Erika Schutz of Mullen PR, 508-468-1155 for Thinking Machines/


CO: Thinking Machines Corporation ST: Massachusetts IN: CPR SU:

DD-DJ -- NE007 -- 5896 06/07/93 09:39 EDT
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Date:Jun 7, 1993
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