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COLORADO BUSINESSES LAUNCH PLASTIC RECYCLING INITIATIVE

 GOLDEN, Colo., June 1 /PRNewswire/ -- A group of prominent Denver- area businesses today launched a major industrial recycling initiative that will divert millions of pounds of solid waste from local landfills.
 The initiative is called Workplace Recycling Alliance for Plastic (WRAP) and will recycle stretch wrap, the thin polyethylene film used by industry in large quantities to hold together and protect products that are shipped in bulk. Other polyethylene products will also be recycled. The seven founding businesses are Pepsi Cola Co., Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Denver, Safeway Beverage Plant, Coors Brewing Co., Columbine Beverage Co. Inc., Full Service Beverage Co. of Colorado, and Ball Metal Beverage Container Group.
 Together, WRAP members handle 600,000 pounds of waste wrap each year. The material previously was sent to local landfills because the volume from each individual business was not large enough to find a viable market. By combining the material, the group was able to interest a waste plastics broker that will purchase and transport the material for recycling at acceptable terms.
 "By combining our resources we can save a significant amount of landfill space, put the material to beneficial use and save the companies collectively about $25,000 in annual disposal costs," said David B. Sheldon, president of Ball Metal Beverage Container Group.
 Peter H. Coors, chief executive officer of Coors Brewing Co., added, "The ultimate goal of this effort is to attract other area businesses to join us so that there is enough volume to support, first, a collection facility and, later, a processing facility for the material in Denver."
 With the addition of new members, the group expects the annual volume of material to surpass 1 million pounds in the first year of the program and reach 2 to 3 million pounds the following year. Only plastic free of contamination is accepted. According to industry experts, volume of 3 to 4 million pounds a year will support a local collection facility. When volume reaches 8 million pounds, a processing facility becomes economically feasible.
 Key to the success of the program is the use of state-of-the-art balers that reduce a 10-foot high pile of stretch wrap to a 30-pound bale that can be carried under one arm. Ball will transport and bale the waste plastic from its operations and from Safeway, Full Service, Coca-Cola, Columbine Beverage and Pepsi, all of which purchase aluminum cans from Ball. Coors will operate three balers to handle the waste from its can manufacturing plant, brewery packaging facility and glass bottle manufacturing plant. Exchange Plastics, a waste plastics broker based in Akron, Ohio, will arrange for the baled material to be picked up at Coors and Ball.
 The material will then be shipped to processors that turn it into usable plastic that is made into a variety of products. The new products made from the recycled stretch wrap include garden edging, rain ponchos, tarpaulins, plant trays and picks, heavy equipment pads and parking lot stops. The end products also can be recycled.
 "This is just the kind of industry cooperation that meets both business and recycling goals," said Nancy Larson, executive director of Colorado Recycles. "Tons of stretch wrap that used to be waste, now will become useful products. WRAP is a model for the kinds of comprehensive, creative and cooperative efforts industry can undertake to create new recycling markets in Colorado."
 Businesses interested in joining WRAP can write to the group at P.O. Box 1539, Broomfield, CO 80038-1539.
 WORKPLACE RECYCLING ALLIANCE FOR PLASTIC
 FACT SHEET
 MEMBERS: Coors Brewing Co., Safeway's Beverage Plant, Coca-Cola
 Bottling Co. of Denver, Pepsi Cola Co., Columbine Beverage Co. Inc.,
 Full Service Beverage Co. of Colorado, Ball Metal Beverage Container
 Group.
 PROGRAM: Colorado businesses use a tremendous volume of stretch
 wrap, a thin polyethylene film wrapped around a load of products to
 hold and protect it during shipping. The waste wrap is very bulky
 and difficult to handle. No individual company that generates waste
 wrap has volumes large enough to market it on acceptable terms, so
 the only viable alternative was to send it to landfills. By pooling
 the waste wrap from several companies, WRAP generates enough wrap to
 have reached an agreement with a broker to transport the material to
 plastic recycling processors for reuse.
 LAUNCH DATE: June 1
 LOGISTICS: The stretch wrap will be baled using new, state-of-the-
 art balers, reducing a 10-foot high pile to a small, easy-to-carry
 30-pound bale. Coors will operate balers at its aluminum can
 manufacturing plant, brewery packaging facility and glass bottle
 manufacturing plant. Ball, which is a supplier of aluminum cans to
 the other five beverage companies that are members of WRAP, will
 pick up the waste wrap from each of those companies and return it to
 Ball's aluminum can manufacturing plant near Golden for Baling.
 Exchange Plastics Corp. of Akron, Ohio, will arrange for shipment of
 the plastic to recycling processors throughout the Midwest.
 BENEFITS: Current WRAP members produce about 600,000 pounds of
 waste wrap each year, material that had been going to landfills.
 The cost (transportation and tipping fees) of disposing of this wrap
 in landfills is about $25,000 annually. The recycled plastic will
 be used to produce a variety of products, including: garden edging,
 rain ponchos, tarpaulins, plant trays, heavy equipment pads, and
 parking lot stops.
 GOALS: Current volume of waste wrap is just enough to launch the
 program. WRAP needs other companies that generate waste stretch
 wrap to join. WRAP expects the annual volume to surpass a million
 pounds in the first year and reach 2 to 3 million pounds the
 following year. At about 4 million pounds annually, a collection
 facility could be established in Colorado, followed by a plastic
 recycling processing facility when volumes reach 8 million pounds
 annually.
 CONTACT: Companies interested in joining WRAP should write to:
 WRAP, P.O. Box 1539, Broomfield, CO 80038-1539.
 -0- 6/1/93
 /CONTACT: Jon Goldman of Coors Brewing Co., 303-277-6214; or Sandy Aderman of Ball Metal Beverage Container Group, 303-460-5273/


CO: Coors Brewing Co.; Pepsi Cola Co.; Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of
 Denver; Safeway Beverage Plant, Columbine Beverage Co. Inc.;
 Full Service Beverage Co. of Colorado; Ball Metal Beverage
 Container Group; Exchange Plastics Corp. ST: Colorado, Ohio IN: SU:


MC -- DV002 -- 4017 06/01/93 14:09 EDT
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Date:Jun 1, 1993
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