Printer Friendly

CHRYSLER AND LAWRENCE LIVERMORE SIGN $6 MILLION COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT

 HIGHLAND PARK, Mich., March 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Chrysler Corporation (NYSE: C) have signed a three-year, $6 million cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) under which the laboratory will assist Chrysler in the use of advanced technologies known as "nondestructive evaluation" technology to improve manufacturing processes and strengthen quality.
 Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology lets engineers look inside complex manufactured parts while they are being built to make sure the job is done to exacting standards. Work under the agreement will be done at Chrysler's Kokomo, Ind., Transmissions Complex. "We consider this technology transfer an important part of our continuing program to improve quality," S.J. Bonanno, Chrysler general manager of Transmission and Chassis Operations, said.
 Livermore scientists first met Chrysler officials last June while attending the Chrysler Technical Exposition at the company's Technology Center in Auburn Hills, Mich. Satish V. Kulkarni, head of Livermore's NDE Section, and other scientists held a series of meetings with Chrysler managers in which they presented the technology and demonstrated the Laboratory's unique capabilities which could benefit the car maker.
 Kulkarni also emphasized that help was easy to obtain. Only nine months after the initial meeting, all negotiations and reviews were completed and the first CRADA between the Lab and Chrysler was approved and signed. Terms of the contract call for Chrysler to contribute $3 million in equipment and manpower to be matched by a similar amount from Lawrence Livermore.
 The technologies that will be put to work at the Kokomo complex are two types of X-ray analysis and ultrasound testing. They are the most modern methods available for giving engineers a look inside a transmission or other complex castings so the quality of the materials and assembly processes, such as automated welding, can be monitored without destroying the parts. Chrysler already owns the equipment for the NDE work, and the task of Laboratory scientists will be to help them assess the information produced and integrate it into manufacturing processes.
 "Training will be a major element of the CRADA," Kulkarni said. The equipment can be extremely complex to operate and the data hard to interpret. Livermore, which has been responsible for overseeing production of nuclear weapons, has the expertise needed because it relies on leading-edge NDE technology to ensure these weapons are of the highest quality possible.
 One of the X-ray processes is real-time radiography, a powerful system that, instead of recording images on film that can only be seen after developing, can immediately display X-ray images on a TV screen, Dwight (Skip) Perkins, Livermore's principal investigator on the project, said. "This gives engineers immediate feedback on manufacturing processes so adjustments can be made before serious defects result." More efficient process control can also help cut manufacturing costs, he added. Ultrasound testing, which uses sound waves bounced against metal castings to detect flaws and irregularities, also provides real-time quality information.
 The second X-ray technique is called "computed tomography." It produces detailed images of the inside of metal castings and is used to detect improperly formed castings. Like medical "CAT scans," these three-dimensional images are made by X-raying many narrow slices through a part and then assembling the slices electronically into a whole.
 "We're excited about this new relationship with Lawrence Livermore," said Charles Roe, Chrysler program administrator, Transmission and Chassis Operations. "We believe there may be many further opportunities for technology transfer working with the National Lab in the future." Chrysler officials plan to tour Lawrence Livermore in May to learn about other technologies at the Laboratory that could be of benefit.
 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy, conducts research important to national goals, including national defense. Current research programs include weapons, energy, biomedicine and the environment. The Lab also has a longstanding commitment to protect the environment and enhance the nation's economic competitiveness.
 -0- 3/29/93
 /CONTACT: Breck Henderson of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 510-424-5806, or (home) 510-797-5059; or Chris Hosford of Chrysler, 313-576-8094 or (home) 313-646-0133/
 (C)


CO: Chrysler Corporation; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ST: Michigan, California IN: AUT SU: CON

DH -- DE003 -- 0570 03/29/93 13:42 EST
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 29, 1993
Words:692
Previous Article:NFIB RESPONSE TO VICE PRESIDENT GORE'S COMMENTS ON HEALTH CARE HEARING INVITATION
Next Article:GENEVA PHARMACEUTICALS AND UPJOHN EXTEND AGREEMENT
Topics:


Related Articles
EATON AND LUTZ WILL ADDRESS ENGINEERS AT CHRYSLER'S TECHNOLOGY EXPO JUNE 9 AND 10 AT CTC
BIG THREE TO WORK COLLECTIVELY ON R&D OF EMISSIONS TECHNOLOGY
BAT INTERNATIONAL DEMONSTRATES QUICK CHARGE BATTERIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLE
BIG THREE TO OPEN RECYCLING RESEARCH CENTER
HIGHLAND PARK, CHRYSLER REACH AGREEMENT
HIGHLAND PARK, CHRYSLER REACH AGREEMENT
HIGHLAND PARK, CHRYSLER REACH AGREEMENT
BIG THREE AND ISRI SIGN RESEARCH AGREEMENT
BIG THREE, NATIONAL LABS TO DEVELOP EQUIPMENT TO MEASURE LOW-LEVEL AUTO EMISSIONS
Systems Communications, Inc. Subsidiary Receives Contract Extension From Chrysler Corporation

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters