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CFIC CHAIRMAN ISSUES STATEMENT ON COMMERCE DEPARTMENT'S PRELIMINARY DETERMINATION IN CANADIAN SOFTWOOD LUMBER CVD INVESTIGATION

CFIC CHAIRMAN ISSUES STATEMENT ON COMMERCE DEPARTMENT'S PRELIMINARY
 DETERMINATION IN CANADIAN SOFTWOOD LUMBER CVD INVESTIGATION
 WASHINGTON, March 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Tom Buell, chairman of the Canadian Forest Industries Council (CFIC), today issued the following statement regarding the U.S. Department of Commerce's preliminary determination in the Canadian Softwood Lumber CVD investigation:
 Clearly, the decision by the Commerce Department is based on political pressure from a small group of American lumber companies, and not economic common sense. Acting like a tough trading partner in an election year may make sense in U.S. political circles, but in this case, it makes no sense for the American economy.
 What Commerce doesn't understand is that a ruling against Canada would be disastrous for both nations. Canadian lumber companies would pay additional export taxes, and American companies would pay higher prices for lumber products; American home buyers would pay more for new houses, and the American economy would have another impediment to recovery. Obviously, the coalition of American companies is trying to make Canada pay for their home-grown problems.
 The Commerce Department is acting as both the judge and jury in this matter. Since Commerce initiated this matter, we are not surprised it has now made a preliminary decision to support it. The facts, however, will prove that there is no subsidy to the Canadian industry and no injury to the American industry.
 It's ludicrous that the U.S. is trying to find a Canadian subsidy on our log export ban when the U.S. also bans log exports. A finding against Canada would only set the U.S. up for a similar fining by any foreign nation interested in U.S. timber.
 We're going to fight this matter through this entire process because there simply is no subsidy. The dispute will test the viability of the Free Trade agreement (FTA). In 1986, there was no guarantee of an impartial conclusion to the lumber dispute. Today, because of the FTA, this guarantee exists.
 Because of this, we will not see a replay of the events of 1986 when a deal was struck that imposed unwarranted duties on Canadian softwood lumber. Our position is correct, and we are going to insist that the adjudication process established by the FTA be followed to its conclusion.
 -0- 3/6/92
 /CONTACT: Janet Lane for the Canadian Forest Industries Council, 202-457-9270/ CO: Canadian Forest Industries Council ST: District of Columbia IN: PAP SU:


DC-MH -- DC008 -- 5922 03/06/92 14:21 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 6, 1992
Words:413
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