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CAPITOL HILL EXHIBIT MARKS 10 YEARS OF MAPPING NEW SEAFLOOR TERRITORY

 WASHINGTON, March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A scant decade after the nation nearly doubled its size by expanding the national domain 200 miles offshore, the shape of 3.4 million square nautical miles of underwater lands is being revealed through a cooperative program between two federal agencies.
 Maps produced over the last 10 years by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), are on display March 15-19 in the rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building, Constitution and Delaware avenues, N.E., Washington. Dozens of features, from submarine volcanoes to canyons, are revealed that had not been mapped before. The display commemorates the March 1983 proclamation of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and describes the applications of the mapping effort to aid the wise protection and use of EEZ resources.
 Selections from a series of image maps of the EEZ seafloor collected by the USGS using a sonar mapping system depict some of the notable features -- including massive underwater landslides, seamounts, fracture zones and channels -- of the new seafloor territory. Bathymetric maps showing the shape of the seafloor, collected by NOAA, will also be on display.
 In addition to the maps themselves, the exhibit will focus on cooperative work with other federal agencies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Minerals Management Service and the Navy are all using maps that were generated by this effort. Among the areas where these maps are being put to use are offshore San Francisco, the central Gulf of Mexico, and in the Mid-Atlantic off New York and New Jersey.
 "This successful cooperative effort of federal agencies is focused on solving environmental issues that are vital to the nation -- especially its coastal communities. These new maps are being used to highlight potential fish habitat, to trace the effects of ocean dumping, and to assess the dangers of offshore landslides and earthquakes to cables, pipelines, and other structures on the seafloor," Dallas Peck, USGS director, said. Investigations of the EEZ also help to locate offshore mineral and petroleum resources.
 The exhibit, under the sponsorship of Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D- Conn.) is open to the public in the rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Spokespersons will be available at the exhibit from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. March 15-19. Visitors should use the Constitution Avenue entrance.
 -0- 3/10/93
 /CONTACT: Mitch Snow of the U.S. Geological Survey, 703-648-4460/


CO: U.S. Geological Survey; National Oceanic and Atmospheric
 Administration ST: District of Columbia IN: SU:


IH-TW -- DC010 -- 4866 03/10/93 10:23 EST
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Date:Mar 10, 1993
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