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CALIFORNIA FIRM CHARGED WITH SELLING BOGUS AIRPLANE PARTS, DEFRAUDING FAA

 WASHINGTON, Dec. 1 /PRNewswire/ -- An Oxnard, Calif., aviation repair station and its owner have been indicted on several counts of fraud, including conspiracy to defraud the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and aircraft parts companies, for selling inferior parts as "factory new," DOT Inspector General A. Mary Schiavo announced today.
 Dixon Aircraft Components, Inc., and Rudolf Augustus Dixon, the company's owner, were also charged with conspiracy to defraud the Department of Defense in connection with a $1.5 million Air Force contract to repair and refurbish engine combustion liners for the C-5 Galaxy transport aircraft. Dixon and his company were also accused of making false claims to the United States, and mail and wire fraud. Dixon Aircraft went out of business early this year.
 Schiavo said Dixon and his company sold critical gas turbine engine components that were inferior and/or illegally modified for domestic business and commuter turboprop aircraft and commercial helicopters. Dixon Aircraft Components submitted false certifications to the FAA on its repair work, in violation of FAA safety regulations, the indictment alleged.
 The companies that were allegedly defrauded by Dixon and his company include International Helicopters, Inc., Norwood, N.J., Aerotech World Trade Corp., Purchase, N.Y., Turbine Traders, Monrovia, Calif., and Aviation Sales of Dallas.
 In convicted, Dixon could face a maximum prison sentence of five years and a $250,000 fine on each count. Dixon Aircraft Components could receive a maximum fine of $500,000 on each count.
 On the Air Force contract, Dixon and his company are charged with knowingly skipping required procedures and repair operations and falsely certifying that all such requirements were met. The Inspector General's office has coordinated its work with the Federal Aviation Administration, which has taken steps to prevent bogus parts from reaching the marketplace and to remove any parts that may have been on the market.
 The indictment resulted from an extensive 2-1/2 year investigation of bogus parts by the Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, and the Air Force Office of Special Investigations.
 As a result of the inspector general's investigation, some 61 persons and companies have been indicted for bogus parts violations, and 40 have been convicted. The IG is still investigating more than 100 other cases involving possible bogus parts violations.
 -0- 12/1/93
 /CONTACT: Ed O'Hara of the U.S. Department of Transportation, 202-366-5571/


CO: U.S. Department of Transportation; Dixon Aircraft Components, Inc.;
 Federal Aviation Administration ST: California IN: AIR SU: EXE


KD-IH -- DC765 -- 9198 12/01/93 11:08 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Dec 1, 1993
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