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CADETS TO HONOR DEPUTY RUN CAPS 18 WEEKS OF SHERIFF'S TRAINING.

Byline: GIDEON RUBIN

Staff Writer

LANCASTER -- Cadets enrolled in Antelope Valley College's inaugural sheriff's training academy will honor a slain officer as they celebrate the near end of a grueling 18-week program with a five-plus-mile run Monday.

The 42 cadets will honor Richard Hammack, 31, a seven-year veteran who was shot to death by a suspected drug dealer at a Palmdale mobile home park in 1992.

The AVC academy was added to help the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department meet its growing demand for deputies.

The LASD Colors Run is done by cadets in all academies 16 weeks into the program. The AVC academy run is scheduled to start and end at Palmdale's Hammack Center at 815 East Avenue Q-6.

After completing the Colors Run, cadets are permitted to wear cloth badges and patches. They'll get their brass badges after completing the program.

Hammack is among just three Antelope Valley-based sheriff's deputies killed in armed conflicts. Herbert Glidden (1920) and Stephen Sorenson (1993) are the others.

"It's kind of a combo event," sheriff's Sgt. David Miklos said. "We're hoping to bring awareness to the area about this brave deputy and we also want to bring to light how dangerous this job is and show the willingness of people to step up and do it to help protect the public."

Hammack's fiancee, Tammy Coryell, and son Richard Coryell, who now live in Nebraska, will attend the event, Miklos said. Tammy Coryell was pregnant with Richard Coryell when Hammack was killed.

"We just want to be sure that his memory is not forgotten," said cadet Chris Quinones, a 20-year-old Highland High grad.

Miklos said the academy, located on the north end of campus, is geared toward training cadets who will serve in the Antelope Valley.

The Palmdale and Lancaster stations are the county's two biggest contract stations employing about 350 combined deputies.

"It enables us to be home and show a presence in our community, which is awesome," said cadet Wyatt Waldron, a Quartz Hill High grad. "A lot of people say they don't see that many cars out here, but now we're everywhere. Everyone knows that we're out here now, so hopefully that makes people feel more safe."

gideon.rubin@dailynews.com

(661) 267-7802
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Feb 25, 2007
Words:373
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