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Burglary.

Definition

Burglary is defined in the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program as the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. The use of force to gain entry is not required to classify an offense as a burglary. Burglary in the UCR Program is categorized into three subclassifications: forcible entry, unlawful entry where no force is used, and attempted forcible entry.
Trend

 Rate per 100,000
 Year Number of offenses inhabitants

 2002 2,151,252 747.0
 2003 2,153,464 740.5

Percent change +0.1 -0.9


National Volume, Trends, and Rates

In 2003, burglary offenses in the Nation were estimated at 2,153,464; this number remained virtually unchanged (+0.1 percent) when compared to the 2002 estimate. Burglary offenses accounted for 20.6 percent of all property crimes. Five- and 10-year trends showed that the burglary volume increased 2.5 percent when compared to the 1999 estimate, but fell 20.6 percent when compared to 1994 estimate. (See Table 1, national estimates.)

The estimated burglary rate in 2003 was 740.5 offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. Two-, 5-, and 10-year trend data showed that the 2003 rate was a 0.9-percent decrease when compared to the estimated burglary rate in 2002, a 3.9-percent decrease from the 1999 rate, and a 28.9-percent decrease from the 1994 rate. (See Table 1, national estimates.)

Regional Offense Trends and Rates

The UCR Program divides the United States into four regions: the Northeast, the Midwest, the South, and the West. (See Appendix III.) In 2003, data collected regarding the Nation's four regions reflected the following:

The Northeast

The Northeast, comprising 18.7 percent of the U.S. population, had an estimated 11.3 percent of the burglaries nationwide. A comparison with 2002 data showed that in 2003 the Northeast experienced a 2.2-percent decrease in the estimated volume of burglaries. The rate of 446.3 burglaries per 100,000 persons was a 2.6-percent decrease from the 2002 rate. (See Tables 3 and 4, regional estimates.)

The Midwest

The Midwest, accounting for 22.5 percent of the country's population, had an estimated 20.1 percent of all burglaries. In 2003, the region experienced a 3.2-percent decrease in the estimated volume of burglaries from the 2002 estimate. The 2003 rate of an estimated 661.3 burglaries per 100,000 inhabitants was a 3.6-percent decrease from the 2002 estimate. (See Tables 3 and 4, regional estimates.)

The South

In 2003, the South, the Nation's largest region having 35.9 percent of the U.S. population, experienced an estimated 45.1 percent of the Nation's burglaries--a 0.8-percent increase from the 2002 estimate. The estimated rate of 928.5 burglaries per 100,000 inhabitants was a 0.5-percent decrease when compared to the 2002 rate. (See Table 3 and 4, regional estimates.)

The West

With 22.9 percent of the Nation's population, the West had an estimated 23.6 percent of all burglaries. When compared to the 2002 estimated volume, the region experienced a 2.9-percent increase in 2003. This was the only region that showed an increase in the burglary rate with an estimated 763.6 burglaries per 100,000 persons, up 1.4 percent from the 2002 rate. (See Tables 3 and 4, regional estimates.)

Community Types

Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), which made up approximately 82.8 percent of the total U.S. population, accounted for an estimated 84.7 percent of the Nation's burglaries. MSAs had a burglary rate estimated at 757.7 burglaries per 100,000 persons in 2003. Cities outside of MSAs, which comprised approximately 6.8 percent of the Nation's population, accounted for 7.5 percent of the burglaries, and these communities had a rate of 815.8 burglaries per 100,000 in population. Nonmetropolitan areas, which comprised approximately 10.4 percent of the U.S. population, accounted for an estimated 7.8 percent of the country's burglaries. These areas had a rate of 554.9 burglaries per 100,000 inhabitants. (See Table 2, community type estimates.)

Population Groups: Trends and Rates

An examination of the data by population group showed that, collectively, those cities with populations under 10,000 experienced the largest year-to-year increase, 1.5 percent, in reported burglaries from 2002 to 2003. Those cities with populations of 250,000 and over had the largest decrease, 0.4 percent, from the 2002 volume. The Nation's cities collectively saw a 0.2-percent increase in the number of burglaries reported in 2003 when compared to the number of burglaries reported in 2002. Metropolitan counties had an increase of 0.2 percent, and nonmetropolitan counties had a decrease in burglaries of 0.7 percent when compared to the 2002 numbers. (See Table 12.)

In 2003, the Nation's cities collectively had a rate of 829.5 burglaries per 100,000 persons. Those cities with populations 250,000 and over had the highest rate among all population groups at 979.6 burglaries per 100,000 inhabitants. Cities with populations of 10,000 to 24,999 had the lowest burglary rate among the Nation's cities, 645.9 offenses per 100,000 persons. Metropolitan counties had a rate of 637.9 burglaries per 100,000 in population, and nonmetropolitan counties had a rate of 584.5 burglaries per 100,000 persons. (See Table 16.)

Offense Analysis

Among those agencies that reported burglary statistics for all 12 months of 2003, the data showed that forcible entry burglaries accounted for 62.4 percent of the burglary offenses, unlawful entry comprised 31.2 percent, and attempted forcible entry accounted for approximately 6.3 percent. (Based on Table 19.)

The majority of burglaries, 65.8 percent, were residential, and the remaining 34.2 percent were of nonresidences, such as stores and offices. The data also showed that most residential burglaries, 62.0 percent, occurred during daytime hours, and most nonresidential burglaries, 58.4 percent, occurred at night. The time of occurrence was unknown for 25.3 percent of burglaries. (Based on Table 23.)

Losses due to burglaries totaled an estimated $3.5 billion in 2003, with an average value of $1,626 per offense. The losses in residential burglaries averaged $1,600 per offense, and in nonresidential burglaries $1,676 per offense. (Based on Tables 1 and 23.)

Clearances

The UCR Program considers an offense to be cleared by arrest or "solved" when at least one person is arrested, charged with the commission of the offense, and turned over to the court for prosecution. A clearance by exceptional means can be recorded when the offender has been identified and located and there is enough evidence to support an arrest, but conditions beyond law enforcement's control prevent an agency from bringing charges. (More information about clearances is available in Section III of this publication.)

In 2003, law enforcement cleared 13.1 percent of reported burglaries by arrest or exceptional means. Agencies in cities overall cleared 12.5 percent of burglaries. Within population groups labeled as city, those cities with under 10,000 in population showed 16.5 percent of reported burglaries as cleared, the highest percentage of clearances among the Nation's cities. Law enforcement in the Nation's largest cities, those cities with populations 250,000 and over, cleared the lowest percentage of burglaries, 11.0 percent. In nonmetropolitan counties, law enforcement cleared 16.3 percent of reported burglary offenses, and in metropolitan counties, they cleared 13.8 percent. (See Table 25.)

Regionally, law enforcement agencies in the Northeast cleared 17.3 percent of the burglaries brought to their attention. Those in the South cleared 13.1 percent of reported burglaries; in the Midwest, 12.1 percent; and in the West, 11.8 percent. (See Table 26.)

Burglaries involving unlawful entry without use of force were cleared by arrest or exceptional means in 14.1 percent of the reported cases during 2003. Approximately 12.4 percent of forcible entry burglaries and 11.0 percent of attempted forcible entry burglaries were cleared. (See Table 27.)

Clearances and Juveniles

The UCR Program considers an incident involving only offenders under the age of 18 to be cleared by arrest when an offender is cited to appear in juvenile court or before other juvenile authorities, even though a physical arrest may not have occurred. Clearances involving both adult and juvenile offenders are classified as adult clearances. Therefore, clearances involving juveniles who may be participating in a burglary with an adult were not included in these figures.

In 2003, only persons under 18 years of age were involved in 16.8 percent of the burglaries cleared by arrest or exceptional means. A review of the data by city population group showed that cities with populations under 10,000 had the highest percentage of clearances involving only juveniles at 20.3 percent. Cities with populations of 250,000 and over had the lowest percentage of cleared offenses involving juveniles only at 13.3 percent. Nonmetropolitan county agencies reported that 16.2 percent of the burglary clearances in their jurisdictions were of juveniles, and metropolitan county agencies reported 17.0 percent of their burglary clearances involved juveniles only. (See Table 28.)

Arrests

The estimated number of burglary arrests for 2003 was 290,956. Burglary arrests accounted for an estimated 18.1 percent of the arrests for property crimes. (Based on Table 29.) The remaining tables in Section IV of this publication provide actual arrest totals for agencies that submitted 12 months of arrest data to the UCR Program.

In 2003, law enforcement agencies in the West reported 122.0 burglary arrests per 100,000 inhabitants. Agencies in the South reported an arrest rate of 107.5, the Midwest a rate of 79.9, and law enforcement in the Northeast, a rate of 78.1 burglary arrests per 100,000 in population. (See Table 30.)

Law enforcement in the Nation's cities collectively reported a rate of 106.3 arrests for burglary per 100,000 inhabitants. Those in cities with populations of 25,000 to 49,999 reported the fewest arrests for burglaries per 100,000 inhabitants, 89.4. Law enforcements in cities with 100,000 to 249,999 inhabitants reported the highest number of arrests per 100,000 population, 125.5. Those in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties reported rates of 85.5 and 92.3 arrests for burglary per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively. (See Table 31.)

Five- and 10-year trend data showed that burglary arrests overall declined 0.3 percent from burglary arrest totals in 1999 and 23.5 percent from the 1994 number. Additionally, in 2003, arrests of adults for burglary increased 7.1 percent when measured against the number of adults arrested for burglary in 1999 but declined 13.8 percent when compared to 1994 arrest data; arrests of juveniles declined 14.7 percent from the 1999 figure and 39.8 percent from the 1994 figure. (See Tables 32 and 34.)

When compared to 2002 data, overall arrests for burglaries in 2003 increased 2.2 percent. Arrests of adults increased 3.8 percent; however, arrests of juveniles declined 1.2 percent. (See Table 36.)

In 2003, males accounted for 86.3 percent of burglary arrestees. (See Table 42.) Of the male arrestees, 29.9 percent were juveniles (under 18 years of age). (Based on Table 39.) Of the female arrestees, 25.2 percent were juveniles. (Based on Table 40.)

By race, 70.5 percent of all burglary arrestees in 2003 were white, 27.5 percent were black, and 2.0 percent were of other races. Of those adults arrested for burglary, 70.2 percent were white, 28.0 percent were black, and 1.8 percent were of other races. Of burglary arrestees under 18 years of age, 71.4 percent were white, 26.1 percent were black, and 2.5 percent were of other races. (See Table 43.)
Table 2.25
Burglary by Month

Percent Distribution, 1999-2003

Month 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003

January 8.3 8.1 7.9 8.5 8.1
February 7.2 7.2 6.6 6.9 6.4
March 7.9 8.0 7.6 7.7 7.8
April 7.7 7.8 7.7 7.8 8.1
May 8.2 8.5 8.3 8.5 8.6
June 8.4 8.4 8.2 8.2 8.4
July 9.0 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.1
August 9.1 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9
September 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 8.8
October 8.6 8.7 9.3 8.8 8.9
November 8.4 8.3 8.9 8.2 8.2
December 8.5 8.1 8.8 8.5 8.5

Figure 2.10
Burglary

Percent Change from 1999

 Rate per 100,000
 Volume inhabitants

1999 0 0
2000 -2.4 -5.4
2001 0.8 -3.7
2002 2.4 -3.0
2003 2.5 -3.9

Note: Table made from line graph.

Figure 2.11
Burglary

Percent Change from 1999

 Non-
 Residential residential

 Day Night Day Night

1999 0 0 0 0
2000 -2.6 -2.6 4.4 -0.9
2001 1.9 0.03 9.3 4.1
2002 6.3 2.4 9.4 4.1
2003 7.3 1.6 12.9 2.8

Note: Table made from line graph.
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Article Details
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Title Annotation:SECTION II
Publication:Uniform Crime Reports: Crime in the United States
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2003
Words:2223
Previous Article:Property crime.
Next Article:Larceny-theft.
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Burglary: content revised 02/17/06.

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