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Brussels approves subsidy to create new CO2 recycling technology for steel makers.

A GROUNDBREAKING Germany fuel recycling project that will slash the use of coke in steel furnaces should receive Euro 30.18 million in German government subsidies. The European Commission has approved the handout as European Union (EU) state aid regulator. The money has been earmarked for ArcelorMittal Eisenhuettenstadt's 'top gas recycling' (TGR) project. This technology separates CO2 from other emission gases as they leave the furnace and recycles the CO2-free emissions for steel production. It reduces CO2 emissions by 16% as compared to existing state-of-the-art technology through reduced coke usage, and is--claimed a Commission note--"the first ever application of TGR technology on an industrial scale." New EU competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said: "The German measure is a contribution to the key objective of fighting climate change without unduly distorting competition." His decision followed a Commission investigation which concluded that without the subsidy ArcelorMittal Eisenhueteenstadt could "not translate the technology into an industrial-scale application" because of its expense. This was even if the CO2 price, currently around Euro 14/tonne doubled. "It would still be too low to trigger an investment in TGR technology," said the Commission.

IGNORE

A groundbreaking German fuel recycling project that will slash the use of coke in steel furnaces should receive ?30.18 million in German government subsidies.

The European Commission has approved the handout as European Union (EU) state aid regulator.

The money has been earmarked for ArcelorMittal Eisenhuettenstadt's 'top gas recycling' (TGR) project.

This technology separates CO2 from other emission gases as they leave the furnace and recycles the CO2-free emissions for steel production.

It reduces CO2 emissions by 16% as compared to existing state-of-the-art technology through reduced coke usage, and is--claimed a Commission note--"the first ever application of TGR technology on an industrial scale."

New EU competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said: "The German measure is a contribution to the key objective of fighting climate change without unduly distorting competition."

His decision followed a Commission investigation which concluded that without the subsidy ArcelorMittal Eisenhueteenstadt could "not translate the technology into an industrial-scale application" because of its expense.

This was even if the CO2 price, currently around ?14/tonne doubled. "It would still be too low to trigger an investment in TGR technology," said the Commission.
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Author:Nuthall, Keith
Publication:International News Services.com
Date:Mar 1, 2010
Words:373
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