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Bright colour brings in the Med style; The next seven days in the garden.

YOU can take the whole coastal theme a stage further and try the Mediterranean style, which involves many aspects of the seaside garden but tends to be more formal, with lots of straight lines and geometric patterns.

Colours are also of paramount importance.

Pastel shades are out. Gardens should ooze blues, yellows, reds, oranges and deep pinks - all classic Mediterranean colours, as strong sunlight tends to devour delicate hues and dark shades become sombre.

Walls surrounding the house or garden should be warm, sandy yellows, oranges and terracottas. This will blend well with any large terracotta pots you have.

Furniture should lean towards the cafe style, and one of these huge linen parasols will provide a cool spot to eat and drink.

If you can afford it - and you have the space to overwinter them - lemon trees in big pots will take you straight to the Med.

The vegetation should be as spiky as possible. Yuccas, cordylines, agaves can all be grown in large pots which will contrast well with the stark walls.

Spiky phormiums from New Zealand make vast mounds of grey, sword-like blades, throwing tall, branching spikes of dark red blooms up to 12ft.

Most yuccas are fully hardy and can be planted straight into the soil. Yucca Gold Tip makes a sprawling mass of thick, wandering stems which are clothed with a vicious array of leathery leaves.

Ultimately, the Med garden is one for lounging in, either by your swimming pool or terrace.

If you are brave enough, you could buy a hammock and doze in the sun while your partner does the weeding. Horizontal gardening, where you hand out commands from the comfort of a hammock, is a form I recommend to all.
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland)
Date:Aug 20, 2000
Words:287
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