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Bowel prep before prolapse surgery offers no benefit.

AT AUGS/IUGA 2014

WASHINGTON -- Bowel preparation for vaginal reconstructive surgery does not affect postoperative bowel function and bowel symptoms one way or the other, according to a secondary analysis of a single-blind randomized trial examining various effects of mechanical bowel preparation.

In a primary analysis published earlier this year, investigators found no benefit to mechanical bowel preparation with regard to the operative field quality. They also found that patients who were randomized not to receive bowel preparation were more satisfied and had fewer abdominal symptoms than those who received the intervention--a dear-liquid diet and enemas (Obstet. Gynecol. 2014; 123:232-8).

The new analysis, reported at the scientific meetings of the American Urogynecologic Society and the International Urogynecological Association, looked more closely at postoperative bowel habits after vaginal reconstructive surgery.

"As surgical intervention for pelvic organ prolapse increases, so does our need for knowledge of [best] perioperative management practices," said Dr. Alicia C. Ballard of the division of urogynecology and pelvic reconstructive surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where the study was conducted.

"Concerns about painful defecation and GI symptoms such as nausea and vomiting are significant concerns for women undergoing surgery," she said.

Women may be predisposed to post-surgical constipation as a result of preoperative bowel preparation (including diet), the lasting effects of anesthesia, the use of narcotics, and the surgery itself. Prior research has shown, moreover, that constipation and incomplete bowel evacuation are not uncommon preoperatively in women with pelvic organ prolapse, she noted.

The study randomized 150 women scheduled to undergo vaginal prolapse surgery with, at a minimum, a planned apical suspension and posterior compartment repair. Surgeries included other prolapse and incontinence procedures.

Women randomized to the bowel preparation group were instructed to have a clear-liquid diet and to self-administer two saline enemas in the late afternoon of the day before surgery.

Those who were randomized to receive no intervention were allowed to have a regular diet. Women in both groups were instructed to eat nothing after midnight on the day of surgery.

All study participants were instructed to complete a bowel diary for 7 days preoperatively and 14 days postoperatively. Those who completed the preoperative diary and 10 of 14 days of the postoperative diary were included in the analysis.

Of the 150 women randomized at the preoperative visit in a 1:1 fashion, 5 withdrew from the study or had surgery canceled, and 121 completed the bowel diary.

The mean time to first bowel movement after surgery was similar in the two groups: 3.3 days in the bowel prep group and 3.2 days in the control group. The groups were also similar with regard to pain, fecal urgency, and stool transit times on the day of the first postoperative bowel movement. The use of antiemetics postoperatively was similar as well (48% and 55% in the bowel prep and no-prep groups, respectively.)

Most of the 121 women--across both groups--used at least one laxative postoperatively, mainly osmotic laxatives. Women who had not received bowel preparation were more likely, however, to report daily fiber use.

"Bowel preparation ... doesn't appear to affect the return of bowel function and other bowel symptoms postoperatively," Dr. Ballard said. Moreover, "the lack of bowel preparation doesn't seem to impact painful defecation symptoms, and most women use some type of laxative."

obnews@frontlinemedcom.com

VITALS

Key clinical point: Bowel preparation prior to surgery for vaginal prolapse does not improve postoperative bowel function.

Major finding: The mean time to first bowel movement after surgery was similar in the two groups: 3.3 days in the bowel preparation group and 3.2 days in the control group. The groups also were similar with regard to pain, fecal urgency, and stool transit times on the day of the first postoperative bowel movement.

Data source: A secondary analysis of a single-blind randomized trial of 150 women undergoing vaginal prolapse surgery.

Disclosures: Dr. Ballard reported that she had no disclosures. Two of her five coin-vestigators reported various relationships with St. Jude Medical and Pelvalon.
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Title Annotation:GYNECOLOGY
Author:Kilgore, Christine
Publication:OB GYN News
Date:Sep 1, 2014
Words:669
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