Printer Friendly

Bluefin tuna: going, going, gone.

Atlantic Bluefin tuna, rigorously pursued because of the high prices they command as sushi on the Japanese market, are being pushed to near-extinction from Holland to northern Norway, according to a new report in the journal Fisheries Research (see "Saving the Seas," feature, July/August 2005). The research, conducted by Dr. Brian MacKenzie of the Technical University of Denmark and the late Dr. Ransom Myers of Canada's Dalhousie University, found that the waters of northern Europe teemed with bluefin tuna in the summer season from at least 1912 until 1950. But increases in the number of fishing boats and more technologically sophisticated fishing gear led to a crash in the 1960s. There has been no recovery in the 40 years since.

"High fishing pressure preceded the species' virtual disappearance from the area, and that apparently played a key role," says Dr. MacKenzie, who also cites the targeting of juvenile tuna, and the introduction of many foreign fishing fleets. "We hope our work will inspire a more precautionary approach to the management of bluefin tuna in the Atlantic," he says.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

CONTACTS

History of Marine Animal Populations Phone: (011)45-4674-3050

COPYRIGHT 2008 Earth Action Network, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:UPDATES
Author:Motavalli, Jim
Publication:Our Planet
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:4EUDE
Date:Feb 25, 2008
Words:190
Previous Article:Saving the Chesapeake with federal funds.
Next Article:Commentary: the E Magazine "Naked in the Woods" contest!
Topics:


Related Articles
Seafood on the skids.
MAKING THE GRADE.
Smart tags show unexpected tuna trips.
Catch zero: what can be done as marine ecosystems face a deepening crisis?
Atlantic bluefin tuna fishery at risk of collapse.
Overeating.
Sustaining seafood.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2022 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |