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Bickerstaffe, Isaac.

Bickerstaffe, Isaac (b. c. 1735, Ireland--d. c. 1812)

Irish playwright whose farces and comic operas were popular in the late 18th century. There is no apparent connection between his name and the pseudonym earlier adopted by Jonathan Swift and also used by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele for The Tatler.

Bickerstaffe is said to have been a page to the lord lieutenant of Ireland and then an officer in the royal marines. His first theatrical success, Love in a Village (1762), was followed by many others, including The Maid of the Mill (based on Samuel Richardson's Pamela), The Padlock, and The Hypocrite. A frank plagiarist, he depended for his success on lively lyrics and sparkling dialogue. In 1772 he was forced into exile by allegations of sodomy, then a capital offense. He lived in poverty for many years, probably in France.

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Publication:Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature
Article Type:Brief biography
Date:Jan 1, 1995
Words:173
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