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Better mental health cuts involvement in juvenile justice--U.S. report.

ATLANTA -- Improved mental health services reduce the risk of juvenile justice involvement according to a report in the American Journal of Public Health May 2004.

The project team examined the ways improved mental health services affect justice involvement among juveniles treated in the public mental health system in a number of communities.

The analysis were based on administrative and interview data collected in 2 communities participating in the evaluation of a national initiative designed to improve mental health services for children and youths.

Results derived from a proportional hazard models suggested that better mental health services reduced the risks of initial and subsequent juvenile justice involvement by 31% and 28%, respectively. Effects were somewhat more pronounced for serious offenses.

The researchers included: E. Michael Foster and Amir Qaseem, Department of Health Policy and Administration, Pennsylvania State University, University Park and Tim Connor of Opinion Research Corporation (ORC), Atlanta.

emfoster@psu.edu
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Title Annotation:Child & Family
Publication:Community Action
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1U5GA
Date:May 17, 2004
Words:151
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