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Bering ice: no floe flow.

The 86-kilometer-wide Bering Strait, between Alaska's Seward Peninsula and Siberia's Chukchi Peninsula, is normally a watery highway for the ice flowing north and south with the winds and currents. Satellite imagery shows that single arches of ice form across the strait many times during the winter season, but they are quickly destroyed by moving ice. However, smaller double arches that block the southward flow of ice were first seen on satellite photos from March 1979 (6eft). Review of satellite data, reported in the October GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, found only seven episodes of double-arching during the past 11 years, each lasting from three to 27 days. The arches, with a common footing on the Diomede Islands in the center of the strait, apparently fail only when ice flux switches northward. SCientists postulate that the blockage, which occurs only between February and May, may modulate whale migration in the area.
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Title Annotation:double arches of ice that block flow of ice in Bering Strait
Publication:Science News
Date:Nov 16, 1985
Words:148
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