Printer Friendly

Baby boy dies after undergoing intestine transplant.

KYOTO, July 2 Kyodo

An 8-month-old boy died of liver failure early Monday after receiving part of his mother's small intestine at Kyoto University Hospital in Kyoto, doctors said.

Shinji Uemoto, a member of the hospital's transplant team, said the baby's small intestine was stable after the transplant. But intestinal bacteria infected his liver, which was originally malfunctioning, and quickly deteriorated its functioning, he said.

''We judged the small-intestine transplant would improve liver function, but the treatment of the infectious disease did not go well,'' Uemoto told a news conference.

''We will make the best use of (the failure) for future treatment,'' he said.

It was the fifth small-intestine transplant from living donors in Japan and at the hospital. The boy was the nation's youngest small-intestine recipient from a living donor.

The boy, of the Kyushu region, was suffering from short bowel syndrome. He underwent the transplant surgery June 15 due to worsening liver problems, the doctors said.

On June 21, he was operated on due to suspected peritonitis, when doctors found a small quantity of the contents of his intestine had leaked, they said.

The leakage was found near the mouth of nutrition-supply tube inserted in his abdomen, they said.

The doctors continued to give him antibiotics, but his condition kept deteriorating. The boy was pronounced dead at 3:09 a.m., they said.

Of a total of five small-intestine transplant cases at the hospital, two organ recipients have died, including the boy.
COPYRIGHT 2001 Kyodo News International, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Japan Science Scan
Date:Jul 9, 2001
Words:244
Previous Article:Tsukuda to launch humanoid robot 'Pino' in Aug.
Next Article:Mosasaur fossils discovered in Kagawa quarry.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |