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BSM warns of drug danger.

With evidence showing that driving under the influence of illicit drugs may be an even more serious problem than drink-driving, BSM is urging the introduction of questions focusing on the problem into the driving theory test.

Three years ago, 18 per cent of all fatal road accidents involved a drug-driver, according to official police statistics. Latest figures suggest that as drug use increases, particularly among young people, the figure may have risen to 25 per cent.

BSM managing director Paul Atkinson, says: "Young motorists aged between 17 and 34 are now four times more likely than 35 to 54-year- olds to have driven under the influence of cannabis or marijuana in the past year.

"However, we are missing a golden opportunity to use the theory test to alert new drivers to the dangers of drug-driving.

"All driver training agencies should be hammering home the point that cannabis can reduce your reaction time and impair your co-ordination, while cocaine and Ecstasy can make you over-confident and more liable to take risks behind the wheel."
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:The Journal (Newcastle, England)
Date:Aug 2, 2003
Words:173
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