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BOSTON GLOBE AND ITS EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION REACH TENTATIVE AGREEMENT ON CONTRACT

 BOSTON, Dec. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Negotiating committees for The Boston Globe and the Boston Globe Employees Association have reached a tentative agreement on a new four-year contract, Globe officials announced today. The agreement, which is still subject to ratification by the 1,100 members of the union, comes after three years of negotiations, the last two under Federal mediation. A vote is expected in early February.
 "We are gratified, said Globe Publisher William 0. Taylor, "that after three years of hard bargaining on complex issues, the parties have reached a tentative agreement. Our thanks go to the Federal mediators for their help and to the negotiating committees on both sides for paving the way toward & successful solution."
 The agreement, to be effective from Jan. 1, 1991 through Dec. 31, 1994, gives the company the relief it sought in a number of areas, including telemarketing; sick time abuse; new language on promotions and grievance procedures; subcontracting; marketplace wage-adjusted salaries for selected future hires; and greater flexibility on scheduling shift assignments and on the reuse of photographic and written editorial material.
 The agreement also gives the company new limitations on mileage rates and use of single vacation days, eliminates a no-layoff clause, and provides new no-strike, no-lockout language, among other provisions. The changes are expected to save the Globe approximately $2.7 million annually.
 The agreement also provides for a resolution to the company's 1990 Unit Clarification petition, by excluding an additional 28 supervisory, confidential and management positions from the bargaining unit.
 In exchange for that relief, the union receives major benefits in four key areas: wage increases of nearly 12 percent over the four-year life of the contract, reflecting a wage pattern settlement in effect with the Globe's other unions; more company-paid health care through a quid pro quo, to initially 80 percent of the total cost; an improved pension program, with an increase in the salary cap on which the pension is based; and lifetime job guarantees for more than 90 percent of the full-time membership. The contract also includes full wage retroactivity.
 The quid pro quo for the changes the Globe obtained is a company payment of more than $1 million annually, most of which will be put into the union health care fund to reduce health costs for its members.
 Also, part-time workers will get additional benefits, including more vacation time, life insurance, and seniority rights for layoffs after five years.
 In May, after two and one-half years of negotiations, the company declared impasse and implemented most of the conditions of the final agreement, including wage increases and company-paid health care. The B.G.E.A. had previously taken two votes on the contract offer, one in September 1992 and one in August 1993. Both votes rejected the offer.
 The B.G.B.A., with about 770 full-time and more than 300 part-time staff, is one of 11 major unions at the Globe and represents a wide variety of staff at the company, including reporters and columnists and editorial writers, advertising and circulation salespersons, maintenance and security employees, accounting staff, selected computer systems personnel, and clerical and office workers.
 In recent months, the Globe has reached new contracts with many of its other unions, including the Teamster Drivers, Typographers, Machinists and Mailers.
 -0- 12/30/93
 /CONTACT: Richard P. Gulla, public relations director of The Boston Globe, 617-929-3288/


CO: The Boston Globe ST: Massachusetts IN: PUB SU:

TM -- NY040 -- 8209 12/30/93 19:55 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Dec 30, 1993
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