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BOEING WINS NASA LUNAR RESOURCE MAPPER STUDY CONTRACT

 BOEING WINS NASA LUNAR RESOURCE MAPPER STUDY CONTRACT
 SEATTLE, June 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Boeing Defense & Space Group announced today it has been awarded a $300,000 contract from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to study a Lunar Resource Mapper (LRM) satellite.
 The four-month study contract, which runs from July through October of 1992, is to investigate conceptual designs for an LRM satellite that would map mineral and element resources on the moon.
 Scheduled to launch in March 1995, the LRM would travel around the moon in a polar orbit for one year. During that time, the LRM would use various instruments to scan and analyze the moon's surface.
 The information gained through the LRM will be used by scientists to learn about minerals and elements on the moon and determine potential landing sites when humans return to the moon.
 "This is an important step for Boeing in supporting the President's Space Exploration Initiative," said Dave Ryan, Boeing LRM program manager. "Information gained by the Lunar Resource Mapper will assist scientists in better understanding the evolution and composition of the moon and in selecting a return site for future lunar outposts."
 According to NASA, a second lunar unmanned mission is to produce a geodetic map of the moon's terrain and to map the moon's gravity field. This would be done by a second LRM-like satellite called the Lunar Geodetic Scout, that would be launched on its mission one year after the first spacecraft.
 The geodetic map would be similar to information generated by the Boeing-designed and built Lunar Orbiter that photographically mapped the moon's surface more than 25 years ago.
 "Although the Lunar Orbiter's mission was extremely successful, photographing 99.5 percent of the moon's surface, scientists are still lacking data," said Ryan. "The Lunar Geodetic Scout's map would produce three-dimensional photos of very high resolution."
 Boeing has more than 30 years of experience in spacecraft design and production.
 Boeing has produced 42 spacecraft, including six spacecraft developments that are directly applicable to the LRM mission. These include Mariner 10; the Space Experiment Support Programs (SESP) vehicles; Application Explorer Missions (AEM); Small Secondary Satellites (S-3); and the Swedish Viking satellite.
 Boeing also designed and built the Lunar Orbiter -- the only spacecraft to ever fly polar lunar mapping missions. The highly successful Lunar Orbiter program, which first launched in 1966, sent five successful spacecraft to photographically map the Moon's surface for selection of Apollo landing sites.
 Martin Marietta of Denver, Colo., also has been awarded a similar contract from NASA.
 -0- 6/11/92
 /CONTACT: Cindy Naucler of Boeing Defense & Space Groups, 206-773-2816/
 (BA) CO: Boeing Defense & Space Group; National Aeronautics and Space
 Administration ST: Washington, Alabama IN: ARO SU: CON


LM -- SE018 -- 9496 06/11/92 19:51 EDT
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Date:Jun 11, 1992
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