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BLACK ARTIST TO BLACK YOUTH: LET BLACK HEROES SERVE AS ROLE MODELS

BLACK ARTIST TO BLACK YOUTH: LET BLACK HEROES SERVE AS ROLE MODELS
 OAKLAND, Calif., May 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Thomas Blackshear II of Novato, Calif., is emerging as one of the leading black painters in America today. His portraits, showcasing the achievements of many prominent black Americans, were recently exhibited at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History and received national recognition.
 Now, the artist is using those images to inspire a sense of hope and pride in black youngsters in his home state. On Friday, May 8, at 4 p.m., Blackshear is meeting with some 30 disadvantaged minority children aged 8 to 15 at the Museum of Children's Art, 801 Broadway in Oakland.
 Amid a climate of recent unrest, Blackshear's message is about the spirit to succeed and nurture individual goals. He recommends seeking achievement and recognition for positive accomplishments and one's own creativity. Art, he will tell the youngsters, is one way for black youth to express their hopes and explore the range of their own potential.
 The meeting at the Museum of Children's Art will serve as the set for the taping of a television documentary pilot on black American artists by Danny Schechter and Globalvision Inc. Schechter is an Emmy Award-winning producer and former Nieman Fellow whose series "South Africa Now" recently concluded a lengthy run on public television in the San Francisco Bay area. Collaborating with Schechter is The Greenwich Workshop, a publisher of fine art limited edition prints and Blackshear's art publisher.
 Blackshear will talk about art with the students using photographs of his original portraits from the show at the National Museum of American History, which was held during February in conjunction with Black History Month. Blackshear's portraits are of people with achievements in many fields, including politics, education, science, music and sports. Among those included are: Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Jackie Robinson, Duke Ellington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Benjamin Banneker, Henry O. Tanner, A. Philip Randolph and Ida B. Wells.
 The exhibition in Washington was sponsored jointly by the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution; the U.S. Postal Service; and the National Postal Museum, Smithsonian Institution. The Greenwich Workshop was the corporate sponsor. The event was inspired by the book entitled "I Have a Dream," highlighting 28 of Blackshear's portraits of significant black American heroes and published by the U.S. Postal Service.
 -0- 5/7/92
 /CONTACT: Judy Davis of The Greenwich Workshop, 203-371-6568; or Marv Gellman of Gellman Public Relations Co., 914-354-3346/ CO: The Greenwich Workshop Inc. ST: California IN: SU:


DM-EH -- LA023 -- 7777 05/07/92 15:57 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 7, 1992
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