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BETTER HEALTH CARE AT A BIG SAVING PROPOSED IN DIEBOLD INSTITUTE STUDY

BETTER HEALTH CARE AT A BIG SAVING PROPOSED IN DIEBOLD INSTITUTE STUDY
 NEW YORK, June 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Imagine the potential savings and improved safety if your doctor -- or a doctor in any city you were visiting -- could type a computer key and see your complete medical history, including x-rays and CAT scans.
 Medical experts could then know which treatments worked best, and they could avoid duplicate diagnostic testing. Paperwork, especially insurance forms, billing and other administrative burdens, would be greatly decreased.
 The Diebold Institute for Public Policy Studies, headquartered in Bedford Hills, N.Y., today proposed such a national health care information system, with its cost reimbursable by insurance.
 The system could save America as much as $60 billion a year in non- administrative expenses and another $30 billion in administrative costs. This estimated total saving is more than 10 percent of the current U.S. health care cost, which is about $750 billion.
 "The new system," said information technology expert John Diebold, "would provide enormous benefits in patient care. Emergency services would have critical data immediately, and at-home patients would be monitored from a central office. Doctors could compare local diseases, which might seem unique, with community situations throughout the country."
 Funded with a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Diebold Institute study suggests that the health care industry consider patient information not as a cost to be minimized but as a cost-saving tool that the health care industry should invest in and reimburse because it will yield net savings.
 Lack of reimbursement is the key obstacle standing in the way of such a system.
 Founded in 1968, the Diebold Institute, a non-profit operating foundation, conducts studies aimed at increasing America's competitiveness and growth. It conducted some of the earliest U.S. privatization studies in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
 Typical projects include a comparison of the information technology policies of America vs. eight other countries; productivity and performance incentives for bureaucrats; and how competition cuts costs and motivates innovation in public services.
 John Diebold wrote "Automation," the first book on the subject, in 1952 when he was 26. The JD Consulting Group, Inc., in operation since 1954, has worked for numerous Fortune 500 companies and governments.
 -0- 6/10/92
 /EDITORS NOTE: John Diebold is available for interviews./
 /CONTACT: Lisa Bing, 203-767-3565 or 914-242-0580, for Diebold Institute/ CO: Diebold Institute for Public Policy Studies ST: New York IN: HEA SU:


PS-OS -- NYFNS4 -- 8632 06/10/92 07:31 EDT
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Date:Jun 10, 1992
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