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BELL ATLANTIC ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF 'DOCUSOURCE USE IN EDUCATION' CONTEST

 BELL ATLANTIC ANNOUNCES WINNERS
 OF 'DOCUSOURCE USE IN EDUCATION' CONTEST
 NEW YORK, Jan. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Bell Atlantic today announced the winners of a contest designed to demonstrate the use and effectiveness of the Bell Atlantic DocuSource information management system in developing education courses. The awards, totaling $22,500, were presented today at the first annual Electronic Publishing & Networking '92 show in New York City.
 Introduced in early 1990, the DocuSource system enables educational institutions and other organizations to convert large volumes of electronic and print documents to "hypertext" files for inclusion with interactive electronic databases.
 "Hypertext" refers to the technique of creating and storing electronic documents in such a way that users can easily browse through on-line libraries. Just as readers of a scholarly article can move from text to footnotes to parenthetical asides and back to text, users of the DocuSource system easily navigate through electronic documents by "clicking" (with a computer "mouse") whenever the on-line text indicates more material is available.
 The DocuSource system's unique document management design allows educators and others to manage and manipulate document collections and distribute them to users via a variety of media, including local area networks (LANs) and CD-ROMs.
 The winners of the contest, which was first announced in the May 1991 issue of T.H.E. Journal, are:
 -- First Place ($10,000) -- Alan Bowes, instructor, Department of Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.
 -- Second Place ($7,500) -- Dr. Robert Wolfe, dean of the School of Mathematics, Natural Science and Computer Science, University of Rio Grande, Rio Grande, Ohio.
 -- Third Place ($5,000) -- Carl Muldner and Bill Anderson, teachers, Owego Appalachian Central School District, Owego, N.Y.
 In presenting the awards, Jeff Beegle, Bell Atlantic DocuSource manager, sacient access to information, made possible by such technologies as the DocuSource system, is essential to ensuring students are prepared for their eventual roles in the work place and society in general."
 Sixty educators from around the nation last summer submitted abstracts that described the purpose and objectives of their proposed courses, the database to be used and how the DocuSource system would be used by students.
 A panel of judges narrowed the field to 10 participants, whom Bell Atlantic provided with DocuSource system software and training. The judges then evaluated the proposed course materials and selected the winners.
 Evaluation criteria centered on use of the DocuSource system's capabilities, such as automatic creation of hypertext links (avoids need for programming skills), support of text and color graphics (multi-media presentations), collaborative authoring (multiple users can access and add to documents), support of optical storage devices (CD-ROM, WORM and re-writable), extensive search and retrieval options and separate print and display formats.
 The three judges were Sylvia Charp, editor-in-chief of T.H.E. Journal; Patricia Stine, manager for multi-media and instructional computing, University of Delaware Instructional Technology Center; and Warren Pyles, Bell Atlantic higher education marketing manager.
 First Prize
 Alan Bowes developed a course module for a new University of Utah anthropology course titled "Computers in Archaeology." Bowes is currently developing the course syllabus and hopes to teach the course during the spring quarter of 1992. The course will be general in nature and will center around the use of a variety of computer-based tools not only for archaeological research, but also for developing instructional "courseware" and preparing public presentations.
 Using the DocuSource system, Bowes created a customized program on the ancient Nabataean city of Petra in southern Jordan. The program drew upon a heterogeneous database of text and graphic files in a wide variety of formats and from many different sources, combining them into a coherent interactive presentation.
 Students will use the program to explore various aspects of ancient Petra at their own pace and to test their comprehension of the material via multiple choice questions at the end of each wait. The program allows the student to examine maps, tables, diagrams and typical artifacts pertaining to the lessons contained in the module.
 The program allows users to find information on a specific topic or combination of topics without having to search through a large number of books or periodicals. For instance, students can either follow the standard sequence of lessons or can go directly to any subject category -- such as the "Roman Period at Petra," "Nabataean Religious Practices" or "Nabataean Language" -- from any point in the program.
 A "map" function that shows the user his or her current position in the course can be called at any time in the program. "Pop-up" definitions are provided for many words in the text. In addition to a standard set of graphics accompanying the text, supplementary maps, charts and diagrams are provided via buttons located at appropriate points in the text.
 Hypertext links take the student directly to related documents for more information on a topic. Navigation is handled via a "button bar" at the bottom of each screen. Buttons are labeled with text and graphic icons and are designed for easy navigation with little or no instruction. A "help" button that provides a summary of all button functions is available on all screens.
 "I hope this presentation using the DocuSource system will serve not only as an example of archaeological instructional software, but will prompt the development of computer-based technology courses in other courses and fields," said Bowes. "It also can be used in presentations recruiting students to participate in archaeological field work; it can even serve as a fund-raising tool for educating potential benefactors about the history of Petra and the rewards of helping research efforts."
 Second Prize
 Dr. Robert Wolfe developed a course module to assist first-year college students in their assigned readings for a world civilization class. He created an initial database of three texts: Machiavelli's "The Prince"; Adam Smith's "Wealth of Nations"; and Karl Marx's "Communist Manifesto."
 The DocuSource system-based module offers reading guidance through unobtrusive hypertext links and, if asked, help with new words and concepts. The course module also provides a library at the student's fingertips, with hyperlinks to maps, biographies, portraits and other texts.
 "An added benefit is that, in time, students will discover the inter-relatedness of knowledge and events," said Wolfe.
 Students will use the DocuSource system's collaborative authoring feature to contribute to the database. For instance, they might add short biographies of people mentioned in the text. Students also will be able to use the feature to communicate with the instructor and/or each other. Finally, DocuSource system support of optical storage devices means the class can increase the size of the database if necessary, as well as have immediate access to other databases.
 "We will explore the ease and efficacy of having students 'report' their explorations of other, interdisciplinary texts through the creation of hypertext links -- versus the more conventional 'writing a paper,'" said Wolfe. "The DocuSource system's ability to automatically create hypertext links -- as opposed to the need for programming -- will enable students with only beginning-level computer skills to produce hypertext reports."
 Third Prize
 Carl Muldner and Bill Anderson used the DocuSource system to create a module for Global Studies I, a required course for every high school student in New York State. The course is based on six components: Middle East geography; people and culture; history; economic development; outlook and glossary and fact file.
 "The many lessons of this module will be linked in a hypermedia fashion, accessing text files, computer graphics, maps and laser disc media," said Muldner. "Students will be able to use the video feature of the DocuSource system to access laser-disc illustrations of key concepts in geography, current history, the culture and economic development of the region."
 Students also can use the DocuSource system's Query feature to research information for their own projects and reports.
 "We are convinced that students' future authoring will no longer be a 'pencil and paper' process but will include graphics, video and possibly even sound," said Muldner. "Our district is planning on training students in the use of the DocuSource system. We plan to pilot the use of student-developed multi-media reports as a parallel to this module."
 The DocuSource system is one of a number of products to be marketed by the Bell Atlantic CHAMPION program, an entrapreneurial venture started in 1988 to give creative, market-minded managers the opportunity to champion "big ideas," from concept through commercialization, with a minimum of red tape.
 In addition to the software, Bell Atlantic provides DocuSource Professional Services, which include product support, training and consulting, from a pre-sale information audit to post-sale implementation.
 The DocuSource system is a joint development by Bell Atlantic, OWL International and Avalanche Development Company. OWL International brings the core media technology and Avalanche provides the core text-conversion technology. Bell Atlantic has added an easy-to-use graphical interface for Windows 3.0, full-text searching, interactive table of contents, copyright management and a graphical interface for Avalanche's FastTAG system.
 A basic DocuSource start-up system costs approximately $1395. For more information, call 800-660-6494 (within New Jersey), or 800-753-4244.
 Bell Atlantic Corporation (NYSE: BEL), the parent of a group of regulated telephone companies serving the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, is a major source of communications and information management services and systems, with subsidiary companies operating in regional, national and international markets. The company currently markets a wide range of business system and telephone operations software programs in the United States and overseas.
 -0- 1/15/92
 /NOTE: Bell Atlantic is a registered trademark and DocuSource is a trademark of Bell Atlantic. Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. FastTAG is a trademark of Avalanche Development Company./
 /CONTACT: Larry Plumb of Bell Atlantic, 703-974-5446/
 (BEL) CO: Bell Atlantic Corporation ST: IN: CPR SU:


TW-MK -- DC007 -- 9955 01/15/92 11:25 EST
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