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Australia : A telescope is born.

It may look like just dots on a page, but an image of distant galaxies taken last week represents a huge step forward for CSIRO's Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope in Western Australia.

ASKAP is developing and proving technologies for the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope, which will start construction in Australia and South Africa in 2018. The image shows that ASKAP is now working as a fully fledged radio telescope after just a few months of commissioning.

Chief of CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science Dr Lewis Ball is leading a delegation of scientists and engineers presenting the results in Europe.

"These ASKAP results are generating great excitement in the office of the SKA Organisation in Manchester, UK, and at an SKA science meeting currently taking place in Italy, because they clearly demonstrate the revolutionary potential of CSIRO's new phased array feed technology," Dr Ball said.

Initial commissioning of ASKAP is being done with six of the telescope's 36 antennas.

"ASKAP is now functioning properly as an aperture-synthesis telescope," CSIRO's Dr David McConnell, who leads the ASKAP Commissioning and Early Science team, ACES, said.

"We've never had a telescope like this before. We can see that the novel aspects of its design really do work, and that it will outperform a conventional telescope."

Dr McConnell said when the ASKAP commissioning team saw the new image, they "practically fell off their chairs".

The image, of a region of sky near the south celestial pole, is the equivalent of a black and white photo, but made from radio waves.

This image covers 10 square degrees on the sky 50 times larger than the full Moon and was made from nine overlapping regions ('beams') captured simultaneously.

The quality of the image vindicates ASKAP's two novel features: 'phased array feeds' new technology developed by CSIRO and a special axis of rotation on each antenna.

The phased array feeds act as 'radio cameras', allowing the telescope to see large areas of sky at once.

"This image shows that the phased array feeds are stable over the 12 hours it takes to make an observation like this," Dr McConnell said.

"Now we can start to use the other advantages of phased array feeds, such as changing the beam size and shape for particular kinds of observations."

As the telescope tracks radio sources, the phased array feed is kept in a fixed orientation to the sky, thanks to a special axis of rotation built into each ASKAP antenna.

"With a conventional telescope we would have expected artefacts from bright sources at the edges of each beam," Dr McConnell said.

"With ASKAP we don't get that, because the phased array feed is held at a constant angle to the stars."

The dynamic range of the image was 50,000:1, which would be a good result from a mature telescope, let alone one in commissioning.

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Publication:Mena Report
Geographic Code:8AUST
Date:Jun 12, 2014
Words:491
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