Printer Friendly

Ask Marsha.

Q. What is panna cotta? I see it on dessert menus lately when I travel.

In Italian it means "cooked cream." Panna cotta is a molded custard (with a little gelatin added for structure) that's often served with fresh fruit or even a drizzle of thin chocolate. It's popping up as a replacement for zabaglione (or sabayon on a French menu), flan, or creme brulee (which means "burnt cream"), all of which are looking a bit tired. These bland, creamy, custardy confections are all right, I suppose, if you're allergic to chocolate, pastry, nuts and fruits, all of which constitute true dessert as far as I'm concerned. I see puddings and custards as just so much nursery mush, desserts that proper English nannies would treat their little charges to after they've eaten all their peas. I believe there are better things to order for dessert than custard, although Nigella Lawson would disagree.
COPYRIGHT 2003 Clubhouse Publishing, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2003 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:food & wine
Author:Fottler, Marsha
Publication:Sarasota Magazine
Date:Nov 1, 2003
Words:152
Previous Article:Ciao, Marion's.
Next Article:Molto Italian.


Related Articles
ASK Marsha.
Ask Marsha.
ASK Marsha.
Ask Marsha.
ASK Marsha.
ASK Marsha.
Ask Marsha.
Ask Marsha.
Ask Marsha.
Ask Marsha.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters