Printer Friendly

Around Australia there is a growing trend for state, territory and national governments to seek corporate gratitude through the promise of certainty.

Around Australia there is a growing trend for state, territory and national governments to seek corporate gratitude through the promise of certainty. The idea of certainty for industry has become central to modern neo-liberal governments globally.

As citizens, we're supposed to oblige our various governments' certainty-driven-agendas so we can continue to enjoy the world's best living standards in the lucky country.

But something is wrong; the more certainty industry demands from our elected governments, the less certainty we seem to have about our rights as citizens, and about environmental health and quality of life.

So whose best interests are being served here--industry or those of all Australians?

Increasingly we are witnessing the rollback of environmental regulation, the threat of compulsory acquisition of Aboriginal land, and excessive corporate handouts--all arisen from industry influenced governments and their certainty-driven agendas.

In Queensland, the Newman government wants to normalise the economy of Cape York Peninsula. To this end they are actively seeking investment in massive new bauxite mines, watering down laws that prevent broad acre clearing and plan on repealing river protection laws. The goal is land use certainty, jobs, services and basic infrastructure.

But should communities really need to sign up for a massive mine for these basics?

As Indigenous leader Peter Yu wrote in The West Australian in April after Woodside dropped its plans for a contentious gas hub at James Price Point, delivering basic community requirements on resource developments is a reckless approach that creates division and uncertainty.

While industry often gets all the certainty government can deliver, no reciprocal certainty is provided to communities for social, cultural and environmental values.

Certainty for business and the economy should be a good thing. But we need to get some back from both government and industry; certainty that prioritises people, place and culture over short-term corporate profits.

Andrew Picone

Northern Australia

program officer

FOR UPDATES VISIT: www.acfontine.org.au/nap

COPYRIGHT 2013 Australian Conservation Foundation
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2013 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:CAMPAIGN UPDATES
Author:Picone, Andrew
Publication:Habitat Australia
Geographic Code:8AUST
Date:Jul 1, 2013
Words:318
Previous Article:I'm looking forward to the dawn of big solar in our big backyard.
Next Article:Nearly a year ago I was in the Kimberly walking the Lurujarri Trail songline.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters