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Area farmers are weeks behind regular planting schedules Area farmers are weeks behind planting schedule Farmers: Gain ground.

Byline: john Broux Pana news group editor by john Broux Pana news group editor

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's most recent crop progress report, released on May 28, Illinois farmers are far behind where they normally are in the growing season. Just 35 percent of corn has been planted compared to 99 percent last year and only 14 percent of soybeans have been planted versus 89 percent last year.

Those numbers are for statewide, and vary, according to which areas are reviewed.

Kevin Walker, who is the grain manager for Legacy Grain in the northeast Christian County, southwest Macon County area, said that farmers in the Blue Mound/Macon area are seeing 60 to 70 percent of the corn crop planted, while in the Moweaqua Assumption area, maybe only 25 to 30 percent is done. Beans are faring no better according to Walker, who says that Blue Mound has 10 to 20 percent of that crop in, as opposed to just a fraction of the crop in on the Moweaqua Assumption side. "Some are pretty far into planting, but overall, there are a lot of acres left to plant."

Mike Jackson, general manager of Route 16 Grain Cooperative, concurs. He says that depending on what area is looked at, the amount of crops planted depends on each individual farm, but says that the planting season is about a month behind schedule.

"Individually some have more in, some have not event started (planting) yet," Jackson said. He said that the latest corn should typically be in the fields by mid-May, and that each day after that will reduce crop yields come harvest time by a certain percentage.

Looking at beans, Jackson says that planting cycle is only about two weeks behind normal, but could fall behind later as farmers try to get more corn planted in what would normally be bean planting weather.

"I think we can see a glimmer of hope for the future, corn will get planted by about the June 5 plant date, but I wouldn't be surprised if the yield is down some," Walker said, agreeing with his

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's most recent crop progress report, released on May 28, Illinois farmers are far behind where they normally are in the growing season. Just 35 percent of corn has been planted compared to 99 percent last year and only 14 percent of soybeans have been planted versus 89 percent last year.

Those numbers are for statewide, and vary, according to which areas are reviewed.

Kevin Walker, who is the grain manager for Legacy Grain in the northeast Christian County, southwest Macon County area, said that farmers in the Blue Mound/Macon area are seeing 60 to 70 percent of the corn crop planted, while in the Moweaqua Assumption area, maybe only 25 to 30 percent is done. Beans are faring no better according to Walker, who says that Blue Mound has 10 to 20 percent of that crop in, as opposed to just a fraction of the crop in on the Moweaqua Assumption side. "Some are pretty far into planting, but overall, there are a lot of acres left to plant."

Mike Jackson, general manager of Route 16 Grain Cooperative, concurs. He says that depending on what area is looked at, the amount of crops planted depends on each individual farm, but says that the planting season is about a month behind schedule.

"Individually some have more in, some have not event started (planting) yet," Jackson said. He said that the latest corn should typically be in the fields by mid-May, and that each day after that will reduce crop yields come harvest time by a certain percentage.

Looking at beans, Jackson says that planting cycle is only about two weeks behind normal, but could fall behind later as farmers try to get more corn planted in what would normally be bean planting weather.

"I think we can see a glimmer of hope for the future, corn will get planted by about the June 5 plant date, but I wouldn't be surprised if the yield is down some," Walker said, agreeing with his southern counterpart. "We definitely won't have a bumper crop like we have seen the past year or so."

And it is those bumper prices which may keep prices from being as high as they normally would be, as a result of the anticipated lower yields from this year's harvest, according to Walker.

Walker says the long range forecasts shows more scattered showers and less general rainfalls, which could be evidence of a decent growing season.

"Just how good, or poor, the harvest yields will be, now depends on the summer weather," Jackson says. "If we have great heat, that will reduce the yield. However with the right type of summer weather, we could see average yields."

Right now, according to Jackson, with the Farmer's Almanac being pretty accurate, that publication prognosticates average temperatures and rainfall, which, if accurate, could bode well for farmers.

"Unfortunately, we have seen more rainfall through the eastern side of the grainbelt," Jackson said. We are much further behind that the western half, which has had a drying out period. Typically Iowa, Illinois and Indiana are the top three states in production, depending on crop yields. In Illinois and Indiana, the wet weather hit later on, and did not stop," Jackson said.

And that same USDA report supports that statement. Only 22 percent of the corn has been planted in Indiana; with only 11 percent of soybeans, which puts that state's farmers even further behind than those here in Illinois.

And with the 25 percent tariffs China has placed on soybeans, the abundance of rainfall is further frustrating farmers. Illinois exports to China, which had been the world's largest importer of US crops, 25 percent of Illinois' exports, levels dropped 34 percent last year, according to the USDA.

And depending on the farmer, some may be planting alternative crops as well, such as oats or others. June 5 plant June 5 plant date, but I wouldn't be surprised if the yield is down some," Walker said, agreeing with his southern counterpart. "We definitely won't have a bumper crop like we have seen the past year or so."

And it is those bumper prices which may keep prices from being as high as they normally would be, as a result of the anticipated lower yields from this year's harvest, according to Walker.

Walker says the long range forecasts shows more scattered showers and less general rainfalls, which could be evidence of a decent growing season.

"Just how good, or poor, the harvest yields will be, now depends on the summer weather," Jackson says. "If we have great heat, that will reduce the yield. However with the right type of summer weather, we could see average yields."

Right now, according to Jackson, with the Farmer's Almanac being pretty accurate, that publication prognosticates average temperatures and rainfall, which, if accurate, could bode well for farmers.

"Unfortunately, we have seen more rainfall through the eastern side of the grainbelt," Jackson said. We are much further behind that the western half, which has had a drying out period. Typically Iowa, Illinois and Indiana are the top three states in production, depending on crop yields. In Illinois and Indiana, the wet weather hit later on, and did not stop," Jackson said.

And that same USDA report supports that statement. Only 22 percent of the corn has been planted in Indiana; with only 11 percent of soybeans, which puts that state's farmers even further behind than those here in Illinois.

And with the 25 percent tariffs China has placed on soybeans, the abundance of rainfall is further frustrating farmers. Illinois exports to China, which had been the world's largest importer of US crops, 25 percent of Illinois' exports, levels dropped 34 percent last year, according to the USDA.

And depending on the farmer, some may be planting alternative crops as well, such as oats or others.
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Publication:Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)
Geographic Code:1U3IN
Date:Jun 5, 2019
Words:1337
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