Printer Friendly

Arameans, Chaldeans, and Arabs in Babylonia and Palestine in the First Millennium B.C.

9783447065443

Arameans, Chaldeans, and Arabs in Babylonia and Palestine in the First Millennium B.C.

Edited by Angelika Berlejung and Michael P. Streck

Harrassowitz

2013

336 pages

$91.00

Leipziger Altorientalistische Studies; Volume 3

DS71

Originating in an international workshop in Leipzig in 2010, this volume provides the papers presented at that event, which focused on research results regarding nomadic and settled cultures in an effort to elucidate the history, culture, and religion of Arabian, Chaldean, and Aramean tribes in Babylonia and Palestine in the first millennium BC. Ten essays are: Geshur: the southwesternmost Aramean Kingdom; Arameans, Chaldeans, and Arabs in cuneiform sources from the Late Babylonian Period; nachbarn, verwandte, feinde und gefahrten: Die oAramaero im Alten Testament; the political history and historical geography of the Aramean, Chaldean, and Arab tribes in Babylonia in the Neo-Assyrian Period; the Arameans in the West (13th-8th centuries); Early Iron Age KinneretuEarly Aramaean or just Late Canaanite? Remarks on the material culture of a border site in Northern Palestine at the turn of an era; the religion of the Aramaeans in the West: the case of SamAEal; Nomadisierende Stasmmesverbande im Babylonien der neuassyrischen und neubabylonischen Zeit: das Beispiel der Damunu; glimpses on the lives of deportees in rural Babylonia; the onomastics of the Chaldean, Aramean, and Arabian tribes in Babylonia during the First Millennium. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)

COPYRIGHT 2015 Ringgold, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2015 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:ProtoView
Article Type:Book review
Date:Apr 1, 2015
Words:225
Previous Article:The Humanist Interpretation of Hieroglyphs in the Allegorical Studies of the Renaissance: With a Focus on the Triumphal Arch of Maximilian I.
Next Article:First Century Galilee: A Fresh Examination of the Sources.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters