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Animal Drugs @ FDA.

Animal Drugs @ FDA. US Food

and Drug Administration, FDA

Center for Veterinary Medicine,

5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD

20857-0001; http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/AnimalDrugsAtFDA/;

free website

Purpose and background

Animal Drugs @ FDA is a public-access, web-based application for finding information on drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in animals. It launched in October 2008 and provides information previously published as the Database of Approved Animal Drug Products, or the Green Book, which was developed and managed by the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine Drug Information Laboratory at Virginia Tech University. Electronic files of the Green Book are available through the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine website <http://www.fda.gov/cvm/Green_Book/elecgbook.html>, as required by the Generic Animal Drug and Patent Term Restoration Act.

General description and major features

Drug information records list details such as: the New Animal Drug Application/Abbreviated New Animal Drug Application (NADA/ ANADA) number; trade or proprietary name; sponsor and sponsor's address; ingredients; species for which the drug is approved; routes of administration; dose form; drug form; dispensing status (e.g., by prescription or over the counter); dosage amount, indications, and limitations; withdrawal time required; and other important information as needed, depending on the drug.

Species covered by this database include a wide variety of animals: bees, bears, crustaceans, trout, horse, primates, and others are included along with the typical domestic animals and pets such as cattle, chickens, dogs, and cats.

Searching

Searching the database is straightforward. Users can query detailed descriptions of drugs using simple text searches or can search by NADA/ANADA number, sponsor, ingredients, proprietary name, dose form, route, species, and indications by clicking on the appropriate tab on the web page. All search options other than NADA/ANADA number and indications allow browsing by a list in a dropdown box. Users can limit a search to all approved drugs or exclude drugs voluntarily withdrawn from the market. Search results are displayed in groups of 10 by default. Users have the option to change the display to 25, 50, or 100 records per page. Clicking on the NADA/ANADA number shows the detailed description of a drug.

One nice feature of this resource is the Recent Search Results button, which shows a user's search history, including the keywords used, type of search, and number of results. Clicking on the search number reruns the search.

Limitations

Not all information on animal drugs is provided in this resource: Details such as descriptions of safety studies, efficacy, and packaging, similar to what is seen in label information for human drug prescriptions, is limited.

Intended audience

Veterinarians, veterinary students, animal care specialists, and other animal caregivers (including owners) will find this a useful resource for drug information.

Technological, accessibility, and usability issues

Because this is a web-based resource, Internet connection is required; otherwise access is free. The database appears to work in most web browsers, with no noticeable issues in Firefox/Mozilla, Internet Explorer, or Safari.

Brief comparison to other similar products

Health Canada has a similar online animal drug resource specific to approvals in that country <http: //www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/vet/index-eng.php>. Drugs.com has a veterinary edition with information from the United States and Canada <http: //www.drugs.com/vet/>. Some consumer-oriented websites focusing on pets (e.g., PetPlace.com, online pet pharmacies) include limited drug information, most likely derived from the Green Book. Many authoritative print resources of animal drug information exist, and a few have online versions (free or through subscription services) that can be searched and browsed. The Merck Veterinary Manual is probably the most well known and comprehensive <http: //www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/>.

Timeliness

Animal Drugs @ FDA is updated monthly by FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine.

Tracy Shields, MSIS,

tracy.shields@vanderbilt.edu, Eskind

Biomedical Library, Vanderbilt

University Medical Center,

Nashville, TN

DOI: 10.3163/1536-5050.97.2.021

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Article Details
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Title Annotation:ELECTRONIC RESOURCES REVIEW
Author:Shields, Tracy
Publication:Journal of the Medical Library Association
Article Type:Product/service evaluation
Date:Apr 1, 2009
Words:653
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