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Although women now make up almost half (48%) of U.S. medical school graduates, they remain under-represented among medical leaders, particularly in surgical specialties.

Although women now make up almost half (48%) of U.S. medical school graduates, they remain under-represented among medical leaders, particularly in surgical specialties. A recent study of academic and community practice leadership found that 97% of Department Chairs and 90% of Program Directors (PDs) in general surgery are men. There are significantly more female PDs than Chairs in some surgical specialties, including in General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, and Otolaryngology. Chairs have more prestige, national power, and financial authority than PDs, so it is important for women to be more broadly represented among the ranks of all specialties. To recruit more women into surgical specialties and build the leadership pipeline, medical schools should foster work-life balance and build mentoring, networking, and other opportunities that make surgery residencies more attractive to women.

American Journal of Surgery, September 2014

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Title Annotation:SNAP SHOTS
Publication:Women's Health Activist
Date:Jan 1, 2015
Words:137
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