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Alter-nations; nationalisms, terror, and the state in nineteenth-century Britain and Ireland.

9780814212028

Alter-nations; nationalisms, terror, and the state in nineteenth-century Britain and Ireland.

Martin, Amy E.

Ohio State U. Pr.

2012

238 pages

$56.95

Hardcover

DA950

19th-century Ireland and Britain existed as "alter-nations" in the realm of political writings and cultural production, as the nationhood of each was conceived materially and discursively in dialectical relation to that of the other, argues Martin (English, Mount Holyoke College), who expands on this idea by examining how British writing and cultural production engaged with questions of nation, nationalism, and the state in relation to Irish anticolonial insurgency (or in the British view, "terrorism"). She argues that modern categories of "nationalism," "terror," and "the state" have their earliest iterations conceived in relation to and in opposition to Irish nationalist insurgency and were grounded in Victorian ideas of racial (and not religious) difference, while class and gender modes of representing Irish difference also came into play.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Brief article
Date:Apr 1, 2013
Words:157
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