Printer Friendly

Above her closet, a mini-loft.

Above her closet, a mini-loft

Two barrel-vaulted light scoops added to the roof of architect Mark Hajjar's Orinda, California, house do more than bring light into the north-facing side of a bedroom wing. They also serve as private study lofts that expand his two daughters' small rooms.

Each mini-loft is the size of a 4- by 8-foot sheet of plywood and sits on 2-by-6 joists on top of a 30-inch-deep closet. A ladder mounted to the closet's end wall provides access to the bright space.

To create the 6- by 12-foot openings in the flat roof, Hajjar cut through the overhead beams and 2-by-6 decking, then added load-bearing beams across the 12-foot-wide rooms. The scoops have pitched roofs capped by 4-foot-wide barrel vaults framed with plywood ribs. Ribbed metal roofing wraps over layers of hardboard and right foam insulation.

Photo: Rooftop view of light scoop shows vaulted center section, room-venting windows

Photo: Loft cantilevers 18 inches past closet. Ladder has 2-by-4 rails, dowel rungs
COPYRIGHT 1984 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1984 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Sunset
Date:Mar 1, 1984
Words:164
Previous Article:The inglenook idea rediscovered.
Next Article:For views, for sun rooftop "widow's walk."
Topics:


Related Articles
Shove the bed away from the wall and let the headboard go to work.
Mother's office below, children's play loft above.
Airy studio also serves as guest room.
These two houses went upward for their needed new bedrooms.
Mini-lofts make enough space for two sisters.
AVALON PROPERTIES STARTS CONSTRUCTION ON 504 APARTMENT HOMES IN JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY AND 401 APARTMENT HOMES IN STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT
New loft development combines past and future.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters